Blennerhassett Family Tree
Genealogy one-name study - by Bill Jehan
   Introduction      History      BH Monumental Brass at Frenze - A
 

Inscriptions and Monumental Brass
St Andrew the Apostle, Frenze
near Diss, Norfolk             SatNav:  IP21 4EZ
 
this page is part 1 (of 2)

(Sir Thomas Blenerhaysett Kt & his two wives)



The parish of Frenze is within the combined benefice of Thelveton & Frenze. The building is maintained by the Churches Conservation Trust.
In 1983 the parish records were archived at Norfolk Record Office, Norwich (Ref. PD496)

 
"What a special place..." - Simon Knott

 


 
St Andrew the Apostle is an early 14th century church, grade I listed as a building of special architectural or historic interest, no longer in regular use but maintained by the Churches Conservation Trust.
 
Situated in the village of Frenze (in earlier times Frense, Frens or Frence, locally pronounced "Fir-enze") close to Frenze Hall, anciently the seat of the Blennerhassett family in Norfolk. Above the Jacobean "horsebox" pew used by the squire's family at one time hung the arms of John Shelton, Lord of the Manor of Frenze and "King's orator and versifier". The church contains interesting 15th and 16th century monumental brasses, several with effigies of the Blennerhassett family or close connections - formerly there were more of these.

Two surviving brasses at Frenze are palimpsests, one piece of brass on each monument being made from a reused older monumental brass, portions of the older design visible on the reverse when the brass is removed from its ledger slab for maintenance or repair.
 
The Churches Conservation Trust church guide booklet (August 1996) by Anthony Barnes on p.1 tells us "...A chancel projecting 14ft (4.3m) eastward was removed in 1827 because it was in bad repair and unnecessary in view of the numbers in the village. The old east window was incorporated in the new east wall..." This left the present "nave without a chancel" and caused most, probably all, of the ledger slabs set in the floor to change position when slabs from the old demolished chancel were moved to their present positions. St Andrew boasted a quantity of medieval stained glass in its windows until a severe hailstorm in 1947 destroyed most of what then remained.
   
"The church is a small building, of equal height, covered with tile, and not having a steeple the bell hangs on the outside of the roof, at the west end; there is no partition between the church and chancel, but there is a beam fixed across the east chancel window, on which the rood was conveniently placed; the church is about twenty-four yards long, and seven wide (i.e. 72ft x 21ft), the south porch is tiled, and it is dedicated to St. Andrew the Apostle; the meanness of the fabric hath preserved the inscriptions from being reaved*, for it looks like a barn at a distance." [BLOMEFIELD 1st ed. v.2 1781, Frenze p.121; 2nd ed. v.1 1805, Frenze p.142]. NOTE: These dimensions are, presumably, no longer true...
* to reave = to break, to remove forcibly, to deprive others of...
 
Arthur Mee's description of Frenze is worth repeating:
"FRENZE. We come to it by a winding way lined with trees. It has one of the smallest churches in the county, a nave without a chancel, standing in what was the park of the old hall. Some of its walls are 700 years old, and it has an altar stone older than the reformation, and is rich in ancient brass. Here is Ralph Blennerhasset in armour as men wore it at Agincourt; he has a long sword and stands on a lion. Here is John Blennerhasset in armour, with his wife apart near the door in a veil and wimple, with a widow's cloak she wore in 1521. Here also is one of the daughters of the Blennerhassets, wearing mittens, and Joan Braham, who has been 400 years in a long mantle with fur cuffs. Only a year after her came Thomas Hobson, a small figure in a shroud. The east window has a few fragments of old glass in which we noticed a diciple's head, and there is a Jacobean horsebox pew carved to match the Jacobean pulpit with its canopy. The reading-desk, with tracery from the ancient screen, has arm-rests formed by monkeys. In the floor of the porch is an old coffin-lid."
["Norfolk" by Arthur Mee, King's England series, 1st ed. 1940, p.139]

NOTE: Add floor plan with dimensions of ledger slabs and brasses. 
          Add "family tree" connecting the people who have brasses here.

 
copyright © The Cleer S. Alger Photographic Collection at Bressingham Steam Museum

photo: B.J.                                click on either image to enlarge
"Frenze Church, Nr. Diss, Norfolk - The Sheldrake Smith family - c1860"
photograph by Cleer S. Alger (1819-1883) "The Pioneer Photographer of East Anglia"
 

 

 
photo: B.J.           click on image to enlarge

"RECTORS of FRENZE" board at north door

photo: B.J.           click on image to enlarge

Fragments of the Royal Arms of King James I
of England & VI of Scotland, are painted on wooden boards - 3 of the boards are missing.

[FARRAR 1887, Frenze p.35] writes "The Royal Arms are on a panel at the west end, but so nearly gone that no idea can be formed as to the date"Since that was written the arms have moved, they now hang above the north door,
remaining boards assembled in a wood frame.
 


RECTORS of
FRENZE


Date
Rector
Patron
Date
Rector
Patron
1294
John de Petestre
Patron
1673
Thomas Wales, B.A.
Thomas Fincham
of Outwell Ely
(He had Thelton) ***
1325
John Newhouse de Snapes
Cicily Countess of Suffolk
1702
Thomas Palgrave
Diamond Nixon
1349
Walter Malvesyn
Sir John Lowdham, Kt
1725
William Baker
(United to Wacton Parva)
Robert Kemp, Bart.
1381
William Payok
Thomas de Lowdham, Kt
1734
John James
Sir Robert Kemp, Bart.
1382
John Baxter
            "
1767
Charles Browne

1393
Peter Rous
John de Lowdham
1774
Simon Adams

1394
Henry Brakkele
            "
1789
Samuel Tayleure

1397
Sir John de Scoles
            "
1824
Robert Rose

1401
Michael Crowe
            "
1840
Robert Wegg, M.A.
(Curate of Rushall)
Sheldrake Smith
1404
Sir Thomas Warner
Gilbert de Debenham
1877
John Rule Tucker
(also Rector of Thelverton)
Francis Taylor
1408
Robert Pope
John Lowdham
1904
M.E.W.Johnson, AKCI
(also Rector of Thelverton)
Sir Ed. Mann, Bart.
1416
Thomas Bukke
            "
1924
Ralph A. Unthank, M.A.
The Lord Chancellor
1416
John Greeve
            "
1953
Arthur William Holton
(also Rector of Thelverton)
Sir John Mann Bart.
1417
Reger de Knyveton
John Hevenyngham, Kt
1956
William P.J. Fair 
(also Rector of Thelverton)
The Lord Chancellor
1419
John Rawe
John Lowdham
1960
Priest in Charge

1423
Simon Warner
            "

Mansel Reginald Peacock, M.A.

1428
John Bubwith
John Hagh

(also of Thelverton
and Rector of Dickleburgh)

1479
Henry [blank]

1966
Joseph William Edmonds.
Trinity College Cambridge
1484
Robert Stukely


(1969. Combined Benefice,
Dickleburgh with Thelveton and Frenze)


Blank in records
(Reformation Period)




1597
Edmund Stanhaw
Queen Elizabeth
(Guardian to Blenerhasset)



1598
John Smith M.A.
(United to Scole)
Samuel Blenerhasset



1593
John Smith
Licensed by Bishop of Norwich



1618
Thomas Hall
S[amuel] Blenerhasset of Loudham



1642
John Gibbs
Richard Nixon



1651
Toby Dobbin




*** The creator of this list sourced their early information from [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, Frenze p.147] 
      with one difference - in 1673 Blomefield names John Fincham, not Thomas Fincham as here








RALPH "Rafe" BLENERHAYSETT esquire
b.c1400 Cumberland, d.14-Nov-1475 Norfolk,
5th son of Ralph de Blenerhaysett of Carlisle & Great Orton, Cumberland (now Cumbria).
Ralph being the 5th son is the origin of the annulet that often appears as a mark of cadency on Blennerhassett arms in East Anglia

In the chancel, a ledger slab marked (A) on the "Plan of Frenze St Andrew showing position of brasses" by Kate Weaver, on p.4 of
"The Churches Conservation Trust" church guide booklet for St Andrew (Series 4, No.53, August 1996) by Anthony Barnes
 
Ralph Blenerhaysett married c1423 JOAN de LOWDHAM
b.c1409/10 d.23-Jun-1501
 
 
Ralph de Blenerhaysett Jr was born c1400 in Cumberland, 5th son of Ralph de Blenerhaysett Sr (b.c1371) of Carlisle and Great Orton in Cumberland and his wife Joan (or Jane) de Skelton (she d.17-Mar-1449/50).
 
In 1423 Ralph de Blenerhaysett Jr married Joan de Lowdham of Loudham, Suffolk, a 14 year old heiress and already a widow, only daughter of John de Lowdham (d.28-Apr-1428) and descendant of John de Lowdham, Lord of the Manor of Frenze in 1280. By this marriage Ralph gained the manors of Loudham, Toddenham & Halvergate in Suffolk; Frenze in Norfolk; and Kelvedon in Essex, becoming Lord of the Manor for each of these places, a young man of property and some standing in East Anglia. He is ancestor of the Blennerhassett families of East Anglia (Norfolk, Suffolk) & Northern Ireland (Fermanagh).

NOTE: Lowdham and Loudham are interchangeable variants of the same name but have evolved such that in modern usage the place name is Loudham, the family name usually Lowdham.
 
In 1430 Ralph Blenerhaysett travelled from England to France as one of the retinue of Humphrey, Earl of Stafford, one year before the boy king Henry VI of England was crowned King of France, a Plantagenet attempt to permanently unite the two crowns following Henry V's famous victory at Agincourt in 1415, only 15 years earlier.
 
Ralph's Will is dated 20-Sep-1465, proved 8-Dec-1483 [NRO, NCC Caston, f.183A]. Ralph's portrait in brass, the oldest surviving image of a Blennerhassett, is set into a large ledger slab that formerly was set into the floor of the old chancel at Frenze, where Ralph had, by his Will, requested to be interred. The old chancel was demolished in 1827, causing this and other monuments to be moved to their present positions. He is in the "new chancel" at the east end of the nave. His fine effigy depicts "Ralf Blenerhaysett esquire" wearing armour typical of the early 15th century. This indicates military service, but he was not a knight. A smiling lion sits at his feet. His inscription describes him as "Venerabilis vir" = Venerable man, i.e. an honoured man, commanding respect because of great age, dignity or noble character.

This effigy has chisel cut marks at knee height across legs and sword, visible on brass and stone. These appear to indicate an interrupted attempt to steal the brass, perhaps at the same time another monumental brass at Frenze, an effigy of Sir Thomas Blenerhaysett, Knight (1531), was stolen from the church est. c1802-1814, certainly before July 1814 when its absence was noted by [KERRICH]. The effigy of Sir Thomas was later found at a curio shop in Munich and subsequently restored to the church by a member of the Blennerhssett family.
 
"Ralph Blenerhaysett, 1475, Frenze, Norfolk" is the Monumental Brass Society "Brass of the Month" for March 2011, by Jon Bayliss.



 
photo: B.J.
 










photo: B.J.
 
 
Ralph Blenerhaysett esquire 1475
Norwich workshop
(chisel cut marks at knee height across legs and sword)
 
 
 
 
DRAWING & ETCHING
The earliest known drawing of Ralph's effigy was made by Rev. Thomas Kerrich M.A., F.S.A. (1748-1828), Anglican clergyman, principal Cambridge University Librarian (Protobibliothecarius), antiquary and antiquarian illustrator [KERRICH]The drawing is at the British Library, catalogued in:
"Catalogue of the Manuscript Maps, Charts, and Plans and of the Topographical Drawings in the British Museum" v.2 1894, pp.66-67, as: "An outline drawing, in pen and ink, of the monumental brass effigies of Ralph Bleverhasset, Esq., (who died in 1475,) in Frenze Church; drawn by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich: 8in. x 6in. [BL Add. Ms. 6728 fol.217]"

Rev. Thomas Kerrich M.A., F.S.A (1748-1804) married Sophia Hayles, daughter of Richard Hayles, surgeon, of Cambridge. Sophia's sister Jane C. Hayles (active 1792-1804) produced
many etchings from paintings & drawings in Kerrich's collection. Jane made an etching after Kerrich's drawing of Ralph Blenerhaysett, from which the print below right was published.
The etching follows Kerrich's drawing closely but there are differences, e.g. addition of buckle detail & changes in the inscription. Her etching was later used to illustrate
"The Blennerhassetts of Kesh" by John B. Cunningham ["Cloher Record" v.16, No.3, 1999, article pp.112-126, print on p.120].

Another engraving of this effigy, by Richard Gough, is mentioned in "The Norfolk Topographer's Manual" 1842, by Samuel Woodward, but I have not seen it.
NOTE: Look for this engraving in Richard Gough's "Sepulchural Monuments of Great Britain" part 1 v.1 1786, part 2 v.2 1796-9 [GOUGH].


 
Drawing by Rev. Thomas Kerrich M.A., F.S.A. (1748-1828)
 
Etching by Jane C. Hayles (active 1792-1804) after Kerrich
 
 
[folio] 217

Ralph Bleverhasset Esq[ui]re ob[itus] 10th of Novemb[er] 1475.    Frens Church Norfolk.  
 


click on image to enlarge
 
 
Drawing of Ralph Blenerhasset Esq. by Rev Thomas Kerrich
 
Etching/Print of Ralph Blenerhasset Esq. by Jane C. Hayles
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hic jacet venerabilis vir Radulphus Bleverhasset
Armiger qui obict ximo die mensis novembris.
A[nn]o d[omi]ni Mo CCCCo Lxxvcuj a[n]i[m]e p[ro]piciet deo amen
 
Hic jacet venerabilis vir Radulphus Bleverhascett Armiger, qui
obiit ximo die mensis novembris A[nn]o d[omi]ni
Mo CCCCo Lxxvcuj a[n]i[m]e p[ro]piciet deo am[en]

In Frens Church, in Norfolk.
K[errich] del[ineato]                                                          H[ayles] fec[it]
     = Kerrich drew this                                           = Hayles made this [print]
 
 
 
Drawing of Ralph Blenerhasset esquire by Rev. Thomas Kerrich M.A. (1748-1828)
[KERRICH]  [BL Add. Ms. 6728 f.217]
image copyright © The British Library Board 1994
 
Rev. Kerrish's transcription of the inscription gives the date as 
ximo (10th), not xiiijo (14th) of November 1475.

Bleverhasset is a mistaken reading of the name Blen[er]hayset
as it appears on the inscription.
 
 
Print from an etching by Jane C. Hayles, printmaker (active 1792-1804),
after Kerrich's drawing of Ralph Blenerhassett esquire.
Her etching follows Kerrich's drawing closely but there are differences, e.g. addition of buckle detail & small changes to the inscription. This etching used to illustrate "The Blennerhassetts of Kesh" by John B. Cunningham
["Cloher Record" v.16, No.3, 1999, article pp.112-126, print p.120].
 
Two copies of the print are in the Bankes collection at Kingston Lacy, Dorset.
In the care of The National Trust, the collection is archived at the
Dorset History Centre, Dorchester. Archive Ref: NT 1252410 & NT 1252591
Kingston Lacy, Dorset - an outstanding National Trust country house - visit it...
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
"This brass of early Norwich workmanship depicts Ralph Blenerhaysett, Esquire, full face, in armour, his feet resting on a grinning lion couchant on a grassy plot. Cleanshaven, Blenerhaysett is shown bareheaded, his hair cropped short to above the ears in the pudding-basin cut, a somewhat disgusted expression on his face. Around Ralph's neck and below the fauld of overlapping lames to which pointed tasses have been attached, the mail that is visible has been stitched to an arming doublet worn beneath the armour. Over his shoulders, he has pauldrons that rise to a point, the left one with added overlapping plates to protect more of the upper arm, which is covered by the usual rerebraces. Vambraces protect the forearms, couters the elbows, and mitten gauntlets the tops of the hands, leaving the fingers still free to move. Articulated cuisses cover the thighs, greaves the lower parts of the legs, simple poleyns the knees, and jointed and pointed sabatons with rowel spurs attached to the instep, the feet. At the right hip, Blenerhaysett carries the misericorde or dagger to dispatch wounded enemies, and at the left hip and hanging perpendicularly is a slender sword."

Writing of Ralph Blenerhaysett's effigy, [COTMAN 2nd ed. v.2 p.60] does not give us an etching of his brass but tells us: "It represents him in armour similar to that of Sir Miles Stapleton and Sir John Curson, like whom he has a lion at his feet". He also gives an incorrect date, 1465 instead of 1475.

The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford brass rubbing collection contains a rubbing catalogued as: Norfolk 1/174


 
 
photo: B.J.                                                                                                        click on image to enlarge

 

 
Latin
inscription: 
 
Hic iacet Venerabilis vir Radulphus Blen'haysett
Armiger qui obijt xiiijo die mensis novembris
Ao d'ni Mo CCCCo Lxxvo cui' ai'e ppiciet' des amen
 
 
 
Inscription
expanded: 

Hic iacet Venerabilis vir Radulphus Blen[er]haysett
Armiger qui obijt xiiijo die mensis novembris
A[nn]o d[omi]ni M[illesim]o CCCCo lxxvo cui[us] a[n]i[m]e p[ro]piciet[ur] de[u]s amen 
 
 
 
 
 
Translated
into English: 

Here lies the Venerable man* Ralph Blenerhaysett,
Esquire, who died the 14th day of the month of November
in the Year of our Lord 1475, on whose soul may God have mercy, Amen.

* "Venerable man" = an honoured man, commanding respect because of great age, dignity or noble character.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Difficulties of
transcribing:
the upper line has: xiiijo = xiiijo = 14 (14th November)
the lower line has:  lxxvo = 75 (last part of year 1475)



mensis
 
The day of death of Ralph Blenerhaysett

   The precise day of Ralph's death in November 1475 is difficult
   to be sure of until the image is enlarged.
   This uncertainty has resulted in varying interpretations:
               The X followed by 4 minims and an O has been interpreted variously as:
                ximo = decimo (10th),  xiiijo (14th),  xvijo (17th)
 
1. Rev. Thomas Kerrich (1748-1828) suggests is ximo = decimo (10th) November.
          (See also MBS online "Brass of the Month" for March 2011:
                            "Ralph Blenerhaysett, 1475, Frenze, Norfolk" by Jon Bayliss)
   I see the reasoning here, the use of O rather than superscript 
   could suggest this, but I doubt itThe last minim of the four is
   j with a tail, usual when writing ij iij or iiij but not when writing M

   - elsewhere in this inscription M has no tail, e.g. M in "mensis".
 
    transcribes the date as xvijo (17th) November.

    The four minims placed in two pairs, a slightly wider space
    separating the pairs, does at first sight suggest "xvij"
    but this cannot be correct. The distinctly formed V used in
    Mo CCCCo lxxvo as the 5 of the year 1475 is not used for the day.
 
3. [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, Frenze p.142] and
                                        [L'ESTRANGE Collectanea 1872-3, pp.265-267]
    both transcribe the date as xiiijo (14th) November.
    I believe this to be correct.
If you have an opinion, please Contact Us

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
shield 1
(damaged)
shield 2
shield 3
shield 4
 
 

 

Arms: at each corner of the ledger slab is a brass shield of arms: [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, Frenze p.143] & [FARRAR 1887, Frenze II p.34]

1. quarterly, 1st & 4th Blennerhassett with an annulet for difference, 2nd & 3rd Orton (of Cumberland)
2. quarterly, 1st & 4th Blennerhassett, 2nd & 3rd Orton - impaling Lowdham
3. quarterly, 1st & 4th Blennerhassett, 2nd & 3rd Orton - impaling Lowdham
4. Lowdham (single) - this shield was:
            reported as present in Blomefield's time c1745
            reported as missing in 1872 by [L'ESTRANGE Collectanea 1872-3, Frenze, pp.265-267]
           reported as present in 1857 but missing in 1887 by [FARRAR 1887, Frenze II p.34]

Shield No.4 is presently in place
- this shield may have been lost and reinstated, or there may perhaps have been confusion as to which of shields 1 and 4 was damaged or missing - B.J.
 

Colour: Individual shields of arms on this and other monumental brasses at Frenze would probably have been enamelled or otherwise painted in their correct heraldic colours. It is rare for enamelling on a monumental brass to survive and none survives at Frenze. Brass is not a good medium for enamel, temperature change and damp over time causes brass to expand and contract, thus enamel cracks and falls away in small pieces.

 
 
 
 
brass rubbing © copyright BJ

Traditional "heel ball on paper" BRASS RUBBING - 102cm x 149cm     on reverse in pencil: R. BLENERHAYSETT 27.

RALPH "Rafe" BLENERHAYSETT esquire (b.c1400 Cumberland, d.14-Nov-1475 Norfolk)
Monumental brass set into a ledger slab in the chancel floor of the Church of St Andrew the Apostle at Frenze, Norfolk
 
 
 
 
 
MARY HICKSON
Irish historian Mary Agnes Hickson in her otherwise excellent "Selections from Old Kerry Records, Historical and Genealogical", made several errors when copying information from [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.142]. She misinterprets the Latin "vir" (man) as the English "Sir", the form of address for a knight, incorrectly naming him "Sir Radulphus Blennerhassett". He is depicted on his monumental brass effigy as a former soldier in armour, but he was not a knight.  Armiger = Esquire.
She also writes Bloomfield instead of Blomefield; VIII (8th) November instead of xiiij (14th) November and A.D. 1400 instead of A.D. 1475.
 

 
"Selections from Old Kerry Records, Historical and Genealogical"
by Mary Agnes Hickson, v.1 1872 "Introductory Memoir" p.4
 

 


 

        
JOAN BLENERHAYSETT (nee de Lowdham)
b.c1409/10 d.23-Jun-1501
(her date of birth c1409/10 is derived from being aged 14 years at her father's i.p.m. 1423/4)

she died 23-Jun-1501 (date from three different i.p.m.) aged c91/92 years
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 p.141] quoting [ANSTIS Ms. G.6. f.39] has her died 20-Jun-1501, aged 97 years

widow of RALPH "Rafe" BLENERHAYSETT esquire
b.c1400 Cumberland, d.17-Nov-1475
 
Joan de Lowdham, daughter of John Lowdham, descended from John de Lowdham (b. est. c1225), Lord of the Manor of Frenze and Patron of Frenze Church,
who held the Manor in 1280. This John de Lowdham probably died in 1297 when his son William de Lowdham gained Frenze.
 
In 1423 Joan de Lowdham married Ralph Blenerhaysett esquire of Carlisle and Great Orton, Cumberland, who had moved from Cumberland to London.
She was then a 14 year old heiress, already a widow, having married 1stly est. c1422 (aged est. c13 years) to Thomas de Heveningham (d.c1422/3).
 
               Through this marriage to Joan de Lowdham, Ralph acquired significant property:
                                      the manor of Frenze (Frenze Hall), Diss, Norfolk
                                      the manor of Loudham (Loudham Hall), Petistree, Suffolk
                                      one of the two parts of the manor of Boylands (Boylands Hall), Scole (this manor being half in Norfolk, half in Suffolk),
                                                                    the other part or "moiety" having been granted by John Lowdham to John Woodhouse
                                      the manor of Kelvedon (Keldon, Keldey or Kelden Hall, or Easterford Hall), Great Braxted, Essex
                                      the manor of Toddenham, Suffolk
                                      the manor of Halvergate, Suffolk
 
Click HERE to see the pedigree of the Lowdham family (i.e. descent of this Joan de Lowdham from John de Lowdham (b. est. c1225)
 



Joan Blenerhaysett (nee de Lowdham) died 23-Jun-1501, this date clearly reported on three separate i.p.m. (inquisitions post mortem).

The date of her death as reported on her inscription brass at Frenze church had been recorded by Anstis before the inscription was stolen, but the location of that Ms. is presently unknown. Blomefield [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.142] when making his survey c1745 for the 1st ed. of his "History of Norfolk" found her inscription missing but reported it as having previously been recorded by Anstis [ANSTIS Ms. G.6. f.39] as 20-Jun-1501 - that date appears to be an error.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Here lyeth Mrs. Joane Bleverhasset,
the Wife of Ralph Bleverhasset, Esq.
the Daughter and Heir of John Lowdham,
who died the 20th Day of June 1501.
 

Blaverhasset and Bleverhasset are mistaken interpretations of the name Blenerhasset,
made by early antiquarians such as Anstis, Le Neve and Blomefield when reading
inscriptions on monumental brasses. Their honest mistakes are often repeated by others.

Warning NOTE:
Need to see Anstis' original note, if that can be located, to confirm if he wrote 20th or 23rd June.

 

 
 


 
 
 
TWO MEDIEVAL STONE COFFIN LIDS
 
In the porch of Frenze church rests a heavy stone coffin lid, former occupant unknown. Tapered in shape, the raised design has been deliberately defaced so as to be almost unrecognisable. Perhaps a coffin for one of the de Lowdham family, ancestor of Joan Blenerhaysett...?
The Churches Conservation Trust church guide booklet (August 1996) by Anthony Barnes on p.2 tells us:
"...the 16th century porch is of brick. On its floor are a damaged mediaeval coffin lid and the remains of a second [coffin lid]."

Warning - If the design on this stone coffin lid means something to you, please Contact Us

     - A photograph of "the remains of a second coffin lid...." is requested
 
 
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JOHN BLENERHAYSETT esquire (I) b.c1423/4, d.27-Nov-1510
(b.c1423/4 is derived from he being aged 77 years when his mother died in 1501 and "in his 87th year" when he died in 1510).
 
In the nave, a ledger slab marked (B) on the "Plan of Frenze St Andrew showing position of brasses" by Kate Weaver,
on p.4 of "The Churches Conservation Trust" church guide booklet for St Andrew (Series 4, No.53, August 1996) by Anthony Barnes

                                                      John m.1st JANE HEIGHAM, dau. of Thomas Heigham of Heigham Green, Suffolk - b.c1446 d.c1472
                                                      John m. 2nd JANE (Joan) TYNDALL, dau. of Sir Thomas Tyndall of Hockwold, Norfolk - b.c1445(?) d.6-Oct-1521
 
Effigy of John Blenerhaysett (d.27-Nov-1510), son of Ralph Blenerhaysett (d.1475),
 Depicted wearing armour, indicating military service, but he was not a knight.
 
NOTE: This John Blenerhaysett (I) d.1510 had a son John Blenerhaysett (II) who d.1532.
 
Below right is an etching of 1815 by John Sell Cotman,
published in his “Sepulchral Brasses of Norfolk & Suffolk” 1838-1839 [COTMAN 2nd ed. v.1, plate 50, description pp.29-30]


 
  photo: B.J.                       click on image to enlarge

 
John Blenerhaysett esquire (I) 1510
Norwich workshop
 photo: B.J.          click on image to enlarge
John Blennerhassett Esquire, d.1510; Frenze, Norfolk
 
[plate] 50                       click on image to enlarge
 
A Brass in Frense Church Norfolk
Drawn Etched & Published by J[ohn] S[ell] Cotman,
Yarm[outh]1815
 

 
"Another example of a Norwich workshop, this brass presents John Blenerhayset in armour that is more decorative and imaginative than realistic. He is depicted full face, clean-shaven, hair falling to the neck and with prominent eyes and lips. From the appearance of the mail at his neck and below the fauld at the thighs, it would seen that Blenerhayset is either wearing a mail hauberk or has mail stitched to an arming doublet worn beneath the plate armour covering the torso. The breastplate seems composed of several scalloped placates and the fauld of several scalloped lames to which some scalloped tasses have been attached (but how is unclear). The pauldrons covering the shoulders and coming to a V-shaped point in front seem to be of a piece—completely unrealistic. Rerebraces cover the upper arms; vambraces, the forearms; and, decorative couters with rosettes, the elbows. The leg harness is typical—cuisses over the thighs, greaves covering the shins, and large scalloped poleyns, the knees. On feet splayed far apart are jointed and somewhat blunted sabatons. Finally, a sword hangs perpendicularly in front, supported by a loosely buckled belt that seems fixed in some way at the hips."

In [COTMAN 2nd ed. v.1, plate 50, description pp.29-30] appears this note: "The centre tuille appended to the last tace of this armour appears only in few instances, and preceded the codpiece, which is seen in Plate LXXV. S[amuel] R[ush] Meyrick]".

 

 photo: B.J.
John Blennerhassett Esquire, d.1510; Frenze, Norfolk
 
Latin inscription: 
 
Hic iacet Ven'abilis vir Joh'es Blen'
hayset Armig', qi obij vicesimo vijo die
Me's nove'b' Ao D'i Mo Vco Xo cuis ai'e ppicietr de'
 
 
 
Inscription expanded:
 

Hic jacet ven[er]abilis vir Joh[ann]es Blen[er]
hayset[t], Armig[er] q[u]i obij[t] vicesimo vijo die
me[nsi]s nove[m]b[ris] A[nn]o D[omin]i M[illesim]o Vco xo cui[u]s a[n]i[m]e p[ro]piciet[u]r de[us] 
 
 
 
 
 
Translated into English: 

Here lies the venerable man* John Blener
haysett Esquire, who died the 27th day
of the month of November in the Year of our Lord 1510, on whose soul may God have mercy.

* "venerable man" = an honoured man, commanding respect because of great age, dignity or noble character
 
 
 

NOTES:
1.  [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805 p.144] in error transcribes vicesimo vijo (27th November) as vicesimo viijo (28th November).

2. [FARRAR 1887 Frenze III, pp.33-34] in error also gives the date of death as 28-Nov-1510.
 
3. [MORIARTY in NEHGR v.98 No.3 July 1944, p.275] in error transcribes his date of death from the latin as 8-Nov-1510
    and that he was "in his 87th year". This age may be correct but is from a different source, no age is stated on the brass.
 
 

 
 
Arms: at each corner of the ledger slab was a brass shield of arms:  No.1 No.3 are missing.
 
 
 
 
shield 1
shield 2
shield 3
shield 4
 
 
 

1. quarterly: 1st & 4th Blennerhassett (charged with an annulet for difference), 2nd Loudham, 3rd Orton (of Cumberland)
    this is as according to [COTMAN 2nd ed. v.1 p.30 & pl.50]
     but:
     [L'ESTRANGE Collectanea 1872-3, Frenze, pp.265-267] & [FARRAR 1887, Frenze III p.34] both have this as Blennerhassett quartering Lowdham.
 
2. Lowthe impaling Heigham
    This shield almost illegible but Heigham arms can be visually confirmed.
 
     [COTMAN 2nd ed. v.1 p.30 & pl.50] writes "Lowthe impaling Heigham" which appears to be correct.
 
    [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144] has shield No.2 as either: "Orton or Lowthe" impales Heigham
                                                                                     NOTE: Orton is "Argent, a lion rampant guardant Vert, crowned Or"
                                                                                                  Lowthe is "Sable, a lion rampant Or, armed Gules" (i.e. the lion is uncrowned)
 
    [MORIARTY in NEHGR v.98 July 1944, p.275] has shield No.2 Orton impaling Heigham but he writes:
                                                                       "...which is obviously an error for Blennerhassett impaling Heigham",
                                                                        (by which I believe he means, Orton & Higham together make little sense, which they don't...)

     [L'ESTRANGE Collectanea 1872-3, Frenze, pp.265-267] & [FARRAR 1887 Frenze III, p.34] both also write "Orton impaling Heigham".
 
3. [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144] found this shield already missing from the church when making his survey for his 1st ed. in c1745,
    also reported missing in 1815 by [COTMAN 2nd ed. v.1 p.30 & pl.50].

4. quarterly: 1st & 4th Blennerhassett (charged with an annulet for difference), 2nd Loudham, 3rd Orton (of Cumberland)

Warning  NOTE: [MORIARTY in NEHGR v.98 July 1944, p.275] mistakenly numbers shield No.4 as No.3, shield No.2 as No.4


Colour: Individual shields of arms on this and other monumental brasses at Frenze would probably have been enamelled or otherwise painted in their correct heraldic colours. It is rare for enamelling on a monumental brass to survive and none survives at Frenze. Brass is not a good medium for enamel, temperature change and damp over time causes brass to expand and contract, thus enamel cracks and falls away in small pieces.

 
 

 
 
 
JANE BLENERHAYSETT (nee TYNDALL) d.6-Oct-1521
daughter of Sir Thomas Tyndall (Tindall) of Hockwold.
 
2nd wife of JOHN BLENERHAYSETT esquire (I) d.27-Nov-1510
 
In the nave, a ledger slab marked (C) on the "Plan of Frenze St Andrew showing position of brasses" by Kate Weaver,
on p.4 of "The Churches Conservation Trust" church guide booklet for St Andrew (Series 4, No.53, August 1996) by Anthony Barnes
 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.142] & [FARRAR 1887 Frenze VI, p.35]
both locate her ledger slab by the south door, but no longer, this has moved.
 
Also illustrated here is a drawing of 1815 by John Sell Cotman,
pubished in his “Sepulchral Brasses of Norfolk & Suffolk” 1838-1839
[COTMAN 2nd ed. v.2, appendix plate 5, description p.60]
 
 
 
 
  photo: B.J.
Jane Blennerhassett, nee Tyndall, d.1521; Frenze, Norfolk

Jane Blenerhaysett (nee Tyndall)
1521
2nd wife of John Blenerhaysett 1510
  photo: B.J.
Jane Blennerhassett, nee Tyndall, d.1521; Frenze, Norfolk
 
Appendix Pl[ate] 5 
                                  

Jane Blennerhassett, nee Tyndall, d.1521; print by Cotman 1815



|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---| foot
Frense Church Norfolk
1815. Drawn Etched & Published by J[ohn] S[ell] Cotman,
Yarm[outh]
 
 

 
 
"This full face effigy of Jane Blennerhassett portrays her in ordinary dress and wearing the pedimental headress, its plain lappets falling in front, a veil attached to the top of the headdress falling behind the shoulder. She wears a floor-length gown with turned back fur cuffs. An ornamental girdle is fastened at the waist by a round clasp in front from which falls a linked chain with either a tassel or a metal tag end."
 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.142] describes this (incorrectly): "on a stone by the south door is the effigies of a woman bidding her beads".
 
 
 
 
 
 



Jane Blennerhassett, nee Tyndall, d.1521; Frenze, Norfolk
 
 
 
 


Inscription:
 
pray for the soule of Jane Blen'haysett wedow late wyf
onto John Blen'haysett esquyer whiche Jane departed oute
of this psent lyf ye vj day of October the yere of our lord
god M' Vc xxj on whose soule J'hu have mercy Amen
 

 


Inscription expanded:

pray for the soule of Jane Blen[er]haysett wedow late wyf[e]
onto John Blen[er]haysett esquyer whiche Jane departed oute
of this p[re]sent lyf[e] the vj day of October the yere of our lord
god M[illesimo] Vc xxj on whose soule J[e]hu have mercy Amen

 




Pray for the soul of Jane Blenerhaysett, widow, late wife
of John Blenerhaysett esquire, which Jane departed out
of this present life the 6th day of October the year of our Lord
God 1521, on whose soul Jesus have mercy, Amen. 

 


[MORIARTY in NEHGR v.98 No.3 July 1944, p.276] in error gives her date of death as 6-Oct-1520
[FARRAR 1887 Frenze VI, p.35] in error gives her date of death as 5-Oct-1521
 
 

 
 
Arms: below the effigy are three brass shields of arms:  No.2 is missing

 
 
shield 1
shield 2
shield 3
 
 
 
 

1. quarterly: 1st & 4th Blennerhassett (with annulet), 2nd & 3rd Lowdham

2. quarterly: 1st & 4th Blennerhassett (with annulet), 2nd & 3rd Lowdham
              impaling
    quarterly: 1st & 4th Tindall,
                   2nd & 3rd Orton (from etching in [COTMAN 2nd ed. v.1 p.30 & pl.50] )
NOTES: [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805 p.142] in error writes 'Fecklin' instead of 'Orton'.
Present in Cotman's time, when made drawing for 1815 etching, but now missing.

3. quarterly: 1st & 4th Tindall, 2nd Orton, 3rd Scales
[FARRAR 1887 Frenze VI, p.35]
 
Colour: Individual shields of arms on this and other monumental brasses at Frenze would probably have been enamelled or otherwise painted in their correct heraldic colours. It is rare for enamelling on a monumental brass to survive and none survives at Frenze. Brass is not a good medium for enamel, temperature change and damp over time causes brass to expand and contract, thus enamel cracks and falls away in small pieces.
 







"the venerable Gentleman" JOHN BLENERHASSET esquire (III), d.27-Mar-1514
 
Lost inscription from the tomb of John Blennerhassett (III) (d.27-Mar-1514) at the church of St Andrew, Frenze.

Warning NOTE: Is difficult to be sure of the location of John Blennerhassett (III) d.1514 within the pedigree,
               he being of an age to be the same generation as John Blenerhaysett (I) of Southill, Bedfordshire, who d.27-Nov-1510, buried at Frenze.
               Perhaps he is nephew or 1st cousin to John Blennerhassett (I). He was not a son of John Blennerhassett (I),
               who did have a son named John Blennerhassett (II), of Southill, Bedfordshire and Hampstead, Middlesex, died Jul-1532.
 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.142] found this inscription to be missing from the church when making his survey for his 1st ed. in c1745 but he reports the wording as previously recorded by antiquarian John Anstis [ANSTIS Ms. G.6. f.39].


 
 
 


 
 
 

 
Here lyeth the venerable Gentleman* John Blaverhasset, Esq; who
died the 27th of March, in the Year of our Lord, 1514.
 
 
"venerable gentleman" = an honoured man, commanding respect
because of great age, dignity or noble character
 

Blaverhasset and Bleverhasset are mistaken interpretations of the name Blenerhasset, made by early antiquarians such as Anstis, Le Neve and Blomefield when reading inscriptions on monumental brasses.
Their honest mistakes are often repeated by others.



 
 
Irish historian Mary Agnes Hickson in ["Selections from Old Kerry Records, Historical and Genealogical" by Mary Agnes Hickson, v.1 1872, "Introductory Memoir" p.5] made small errors copying this inscription from [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.142]
 
This is Hickson's version >--->
 
 
 
 




 
 
GEORGE DUKE d.25-Jul-1551
husband of ANNE DUKE (nee Blenerhaysett) b.1515 d.16-Apr-1577
what remains of this brass is a palimpest
 
In the chancel, a ledger slab marked (G) on the "Plan of Frenze St Andrew showing position of brasses" by Kate Weaver,
on p.4 of "The Churches Conservation Trust" church guide booklet for St Andrew (Series 4, No.53, August 1996) by Anthony Barnes
 
Anne's effigy is alongside her husband's on his tomb at Frenze, but she was not interred there.
she is at St Margaret's church, Norwich 1577.
she also outlived her 2nd husband PETER REDE
He d.29-Dec-1568 at London, interred at St Sepulchure's without Newgate, London;
Peter Rede's body was exhumed, to be reinterred at St Peter Mancroft, Norwich
under a reused brass carrying an effigy clad in the armour of 100 years earlier, with four brass shields of arms.
 
Anne Blenerhaysett, daughter of Sir Thomas Blenerhaysett, Kt (d.1531) married 1stly George Duke esquire & 2ndly Peter Rede esquire of Norwich.

The tomb of her 1st husband George Duke is in the chancel at Frenze, near the communion table. On his tomb of 1551 were separate effigies of himself and his wife, side by side, but Anne remarried so was not interred with George. George Duke's effigy and the four shields of arms are missing but it is recorded that he was dressed as a civilian, with cloak and sword. The effigy for Anne Duke (nee Blenerhaysett) remains but is damaged, the lower part missing.
 
[COTMAN 2nd ed. vol.1 p.42 & pl.80] tells us Anne Rede "...was the widow of the person whose memorial is given under the date 1568. Her executors are not liable to the charge of fraud, which was made against his; for her figure affords us a singular and not inelegant example of female dress in the middle of the reign of Elizabeth."
 
[COTMAN 2nd ed. vol.1 p.421 & pl.77] tells us of the brass for Peter Rede "This monument is placed in memory of a man who appears to haver deserved a better, by his courage abroad and his liberality at home. The spirit of economy, however, in his executors, prompted them to adopt an effigy, which probably represented some other man a century before, fitting a new head to it with a more modern helmet. At each corner of the stone was a shield. Read, Azure, on a bend wavy Or three moorcocks Sable, within a bordure engrailed Argent pellete, a crescent ermine; with the following honourable addition given by the Emperor, viz. a canton sinister parted per pale, on the first part two ragged staves in saltire, on the second, a man holding a caduceus in his right hand, his left pointing upwards; on his sinister side, a sword in pale, with the point downwards pricked into a moor's head. Another shield impales Blenerhasset, his wife being a daughter of that family. She survived him nine years, and was buried in St. Margaret's church. Her effigy is given under date 1577."
 
 
photo: B.J.

 
photo: B.J.

 
 

 
 
 
George Duke esquire 1551 at Frenze (his effigy missing)
with his wife Anne Duke (nee Blenerhaysett).

Anne d.1577 - she remarried and is not buried here.
 
Rubbing of engraving on reverse of inscription brass for George Duke, 1551.
illustrated in "The Frenze Palimpsest" by Nicholas J. Rogers,
Monumental Brass Society Bulletin No.64, Oct.1993, p.75

reproduced as fig.3 in a thesis by Rebecca Pinner, 2010
"St Edmund, King and Martyr: Constructing his Cult in Medieval East Anglia"
 


Warning add Hamline description here...

left - George Duke: This effigy is missing. He was dressed as a civilian, with cloak and sword.

right - Anne Duke: 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.143] writes "her head lies on a pillow, and her beads hang before her..." (incorrectly regarding beads).

The inscription brass is a palimpsest, made from a reused older monumental brass, the older design visible on the reverse when the brass removed is from its ledger slab for maintenance or repair. The reverse of this example shows an unusual engraving, believed to depict St Edmund killing the Danish King Sweyn Forkbeard (d.1014). This brass is believed to have come from a screen or door associated with the shrine of St Edmund, formerly located behind the high altar of Bury St Edmunds Abbey in Suffolk, probably removed for reuse following destruction of the abbey and shrine by fire in 1465. The palimpsest came to light in 1987 when the brass was temporally removed for display in the Monumental Brass Society anniversary exhibition held at the Victoria & Albert Museum, South Kensington.

Sources for this palimpsest:
- "Death and the Impenitent Avaricious King: A Unique Brass Discovered at Frenze, Norfolk" by John Goodall, "Apollo" N.S. No.126, Oct.1987, pp.264-266
- "Palimpsest Brasses" by John Page-Phillips, in "Monumental Brasses as Art and History" edited by JeromeBertram 1996, pp.134,136, fig.104
   (on p.177 is:  p.55 footnote 2: add One may be the palimpsest of the brass re-used for a memorial
    to Anne Blenerhaysett in Frenze church, just north of the Suffolk border. See MBS Bulletin No.50, 1980 p.358)
- "Suffolk in the Middle Ages: Studies in Places and Place Names, the Sutton Hoo..." by Norman Scarfe 2004, pp.55
- "The Frenze Palimpsest" by Nicholas J. Rogers, in Monumental Brass Society Bulletin No.64, Oct.1993, pp.75-77
- "The Frenze Palimpsest" by Nicholas J. Rogers, in Tributes to Nigel Morgan, contexts of Medieval Art: images, Objects & Ideas
    ed. Julian M. Luxford and M. A. Michael (London, 2010), pp. 223-237. A book review is in the MBS bulletin for Feb.2011, p.319.
 
 
 
 
 
photo:B.J.

 
 

 
 

 
Heare under lyeth George Duke Esquyre
who maryed Anne the dawghter of syr thom'
 Blenerhaysett Knyght the whyche George
dyed the xxv. daye of July. In the yeare
of oure lorde god A M . CCCCC . li :
Whose Sowle God pardon . Amen .
 

 
 

Heare under lieth George Duke Esquyre
who maryed Anne the daughter of Syr Thom[as]
 Blenerhaysett Knyght the whyche George
dyed the 25th daye of July in the yeare
of oure lorde god A[nno domini] : 1551 :
Whose Sowle God pardon . Amen .

 
 
 
 

Arms: George & Anne Duke's monumental brass at Frenze formerly had (with two effigies) four shields of arms, all missing:

 
 

shield 1
shield 2
shield 3
shield 4
 
 

      1. & 2. were present in Blomefield's time c1745 [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.143] but now missing.
      3. & 4. were missing in Blomefield's time c1745 but [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.143] reports earlier descriptions by Mr Le Neve, as follows:

      1. quarterly: 1st Duke, 2nd Banyard (charged with two annulets interlaced on the fess, for difference), 3rd Park, 4th Ilketshall
                                   impaling
                         Blennerhassett quartering Lowdham, Kelvedon, Orton & Skelton (of Cumberland)
 
      2. quarterly: Blennerhassett quartering Lowdham, Kelvedon, Orton & Skelton

      3. quarterly: 1st Duke, 2nd Banyard (charged with two annulets interlaced on the fess, for difference), 3rd Park, 4th Ilketshall

      4. quarterly: 1st Duke, 2nd Banyard (charged with two annulets interlaced on the fess, for difference), 3rd Park, 4th Ilketshall
                                   impaling
                         Jenney, quartering Buckle and Leiston
 
Colour: Individual shields of arms on this and other monumental brasses at Frenze would probably have been enamelled or otherwise painted in their correct heraldic colours. It is rare for enamelling on a monumental brass to survive and none survives at Frenze. Brass is not a good medium for enamel, temperature change and damp over time causes brass to expand and contract, thus enamel cracks and falls away in small pieces.

 
Anne Duke's brass at St Margaret's church, Norwich, Norfolk has her effigy and a shield of arms:
 
      Anne died 16-Apr-1677 at Norwich and is buried at St Margaret's Church, Norwich.
           "She is also represented on a brass in St. Margaret's church in that city, 1577, and the difference of costume is very singular".
           ["A Picture of the town of Diss and its neighbourhood, Antiquarian and Descriptive" printed by J.M.Burton, Ipswich 1849]
 
      Her husband Peter Rede esquire died at London 29-Dec-1568, buried in St Sepulchure's without Newgate, London,
      later reinterred at St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, where he lies under an unusual monumental brass effigy,
      he wearing armour in the style of 100years earlier. It is possible this was an effigy, reused.
      Peter Rede'sinscription includes:
 
                 "...worthely served not only his Prynce and Cuntrey but also the Emperor Charles the 5,
                  bothe at the conqueste of Barbaria and at the siege of Tunis, as also in other places,
                  who had given hym by tyhe(?) sayd emperor for hys vallaunt dedes the Order of Bararia"
 
 
 




 
 
THOMAZIN PLATERS (nee Duke), d.23-Dec-1560
wife of William Platers; daughter of George Duke & Anne Blenerhaysett
 
On the north wall of the chancel, marked (H) on the "Plan of Frenze St Andrew showing position of brasses" by Kate Weaver,
on p.4 of "The Churches Conservation Trust" church guide booklet for St Andrew (Series 4, No.53, August 1996) by Anthony Barnes
 
This inscription brass is set into a new mahogany backplate.
 The former position of the brass shows on the wall underneath.
 
 
photo: B.J.

 
 
 

Here under lyethe Thomazin Platers Daughter of George
Duke Esquyer and Wife to William Platers sonne & heier
of Thomas Platers of Soterley Esquier, whiche Thomazin
Dyed the xiijth daye of Decmber in the second yere of the
reigne of or Sove'igne Lady Quene Elizabethe . Ao 1560 .
 
 
 
 
 
 
Here under lyethe Thomazin Platers, Daughter of George
Duke Esquyer, and Wife to William Platers sonne & heier
of Thomas Platers of Soterley Esquier, whiche Thomazin
Dyed the 13th daye of Dec[e]mber in the second yere of the
reigne of o[u]r Sove[r]igne Lady Quene Elizabethe . A[nn]o [Domini] 1560 .
 
 
 

Arms: - both present in Blomefield's time c1745 [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144] but now missing.
 
 
1. Platers
2. Platers impaling "Duke and his quarterings"
                            i.e. 1st Duke, 2nd Banyard (charged with two annulets interlaced on the fess, for difference), 3rd Park, 4th Ilketshall
 
 
 




 
 
WILLIAM PLATERS
husband of Thomazin Platers (d.23-Dec-1560) the daughter of George Duke & Anne Blenerhaysett

[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144] records this as an effigy with an inscription reported earlier by Anstis [ANSTIS Ms. E.26. f.23]
This brass with two shields of arms were already missing in Blomefield's time c1745 but he reports the physical impression remaining on the North Chancel wall, further to the East than the last mentioned "Thomazin Platers 1560" brass.
 
 
 
 




 





 
 
Orate pro animabus Willi Platers et Thomazin uxoris suae filiae....  Duke....
 
 
NOTE: Some online sources for Blomefield's "Norfolk" wrongly transcribe uxoris: as uroris:

 

Translation into English:

 
 
Pray for the souls of William Platers and Thomazin his former wife, daughter [of George] Duke....


 
 
 
 

Arms: [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144] found this brass to be missing from the church when making his survey for his 1st ed. in c1745.
 
1. Platers
2. Duke
 
 




 
 
THOMAS HOBSON (undated - by style estimated c1520)
 
In the nave, a ledger slab marked (J) on the "Plan of Frenze St Andrew showing position of brasses" by Kate Weaver,
on p.4 of "The Churches Conservation Trust" church guide booklet for St Andrew (Series 4, No.53, August 1996) by Anthony Barnes

 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. 1805, p.145] tells us: "On a brass plated stone near the north door, a man in his winding sheet" but has moved since Blomefield's time.
This unusual effigy is also described "a body tied in a shroud at the head and feet and open in the front".
The brass is of Norwich workmanship. By style, the date of the brass has been estimated c1520.

The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford brass rubbing collection has a rubbing catalogued as: Norfolk 1/183

 
photo: B.J.
 
photo: B.J.
 
 
THOMAS HOBSON
(undated, estimated c1520)
Norwich workshop
 
 
 

 
photo: B.J.
 

 
 
 
 
Pray for ye Sowle of your charite,
of Thomas Hobson to ye trynyte
 
 

Expanded Inscription

 
Pray for the Soul, of your charity,

of Thomas Hobson to the [holy] trinity
 
 
 

BLENNERHASSETT - HOBSON CONNECTION:

 
"The Churches Conservation Trust" church guide booklet for St Andrew (August 1996) by Anthony Barnes, on p.4 states, regarding Thomas Hobson, "It is not known whether he is one of the [Blennerhassett] family". Although this is true, there is a known connection between the Blennerhassett and Hobson families:
 
John Blennerhassett (I) (b.c1423/4 d.27-Nov-1510, buried at Frenze) lived on his estate at Southill in Bedfordshire until, at his father's death, he inherited Frenze, Loudham, Kelvedon and a part of Boylands. John had married 1stly c1460 Jane Heigham (b.c1446 d.c1472, buried at Gazeley, Suffolk) and married 2ndly (before 26-Mar-1473) to Jane Tyndall (d.6-Oct-1521, buried at Frenze).
 
The eldest son of John Blennerhassett (I) and Jane Tyndall was John Blennerhassett (II) of Hampstead, Middlesex and Southill, Bedfordshire.
John Blennerhassett (II) d.?-Jul-1532 but, although his place of is burial is unknown, he cannot be identical with John Blennerhassett (III) who is buried at Frenze because antiquarian John Anstis [ANSTIS Ms. G.6. f.39] in [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.142] reports that John Blennerhassett (III) d.27-Mar-1514.
 
John Blennerhassett (II) of Hampstead, Middlesex and Southill, Bedfordshire may perhaps be identical with another John Blennerhassett who married Jane (Joan) Hobson d.c1515 (maiden name unknown), widow of Thomas Hobson, as follows:
 
Jane Blennerhassett of London, by her Will (dated 17-Jun-1513 when her 2nd husband John Blennerhassett was living, proved 2-May-1515) requested to be buried next to her 1st husband Thomas Hobson of London, in the church of the Order of St John of Jerusalem in England (this order dissolved 1540) at Clerkenwell, London. A wealthy man, Thomas Hobson (d.Feb/Mar-1511) had owned the manors of Marylebone, Westbourne, Charing, Gey(?), Tyburn and Lillistone in Middlesex, by his Will bequeathing them all to his wife Jane, for her lifetime; also property in Lincolnshire.
They had children John, Richard and Elizabeth Hobson. This John Blennerhassett and his wife Joan in 1512 held leases on Tyburn Fields (in 1552 his executors disposed of this to Justice Portman) and on lands in Lillestone Manor.
 
Warning Immediate questions are:

1. How does Thomas Hobson interred at Frenze (from the style of brass est. c1520) relate to Thomas Hobson of London (1st husband of Jane, maiden name unknown, who married 2ndly to a John Blennerhassett)?
   
2. Were the remains of Thomas Hobson of London (who in 1511 was interred at the church of St John of Jerusalem at Clerkenwell) perhaps later moved to Frenze, rather than his widow when she died being buried with him in London, as she had requested in her Will of 1513?

3. When the Order of St John of Jerusalem in England was dissolved in 1540, was their church at Clerkenwell demolished and could the remains have perhaps been moved then? Were they both perhaps buried at Frenze?
 
 




 
 
THOMAS ROPKYN
of Brightlead's tenement in Scole, Norfolk

[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.145] tells us:
 "I find among the evidences of Brightlead's tenement in Scole, that Thomas Ropkyn was buried here, with this inscription, now lost:"
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Pray for the Sowle of Thomas Ropkyn.
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 


 
 

 MARY BACON (previously CULPEPPER, nee BLENNERHASSETT) b.c1517/18 d.17-Sep-1587
daughter of George Blennerhassett & his 1st wife Anne Covert
 
In the chancel, a ledger slab marked (F) on the "Plan of Frenze St Andrew showing position of brasses" by Kate Weaver,
on p.4 of "The Churches Conservation Trust" church guide booklet for St Andrew (Series 4, No.53, August 1996) by Anthony Barnes
 
[BLOMEFIELD 1st ed. v.2 1781, p.123] in error named her "Maria, wife of Sir George Bleverhasset, bart. September 7, 1587, aet.70"
(Mary was George's daughter not his wife; he was not "Sir" not a baronet; she died on 17th not 7th)
but this corrected in [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144]
 
 
also illustrated here is an etching of 1816 by John Sell Cotman,
published in his “Sepulchral Brasses of Norfolk & Suffolk” 1838-1839 [COTMAN v.2, plate 83, description p.43].
 
NOTE: One of the pieces of this monument is a palimpsest, made from a reused older monumental brass, portions
of the older design visible on the reverse when the brass is removed from its ledger slab for maintenance or repair.
The palimpsest effigy is said to show a large part of an early 15th century effigy of an unknown academic.




 
photo: B.J.                                    click on image to rotate & enlarge

Mary Bacon
(previously CULPEPPER, nee BLENNERHASSETT)
1587
 
 
click on image to enlarge
[plate] 83
|---------------------------------|
Arms and Inscription for Mary Bacon, Frenze Ch[urch] Norf[ol]k
Drawn Etched & Published by J[ohn] S[ell] Cotman, Yar[mouth] 1816
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




photo: B.J.                                     click on image to enlarge
Mary Blennerhassett Bacon Culpepper d.1587
 
 
 

 
 
An inaccurate version published by Irish historian Mary Agnes Hickson in:
["Selections from Old Kerry Records, Historical and Genealogical"
by Mary Agnes Hickson, v.1 1872, "Introductory Memoir" p.5].
She used as her source [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.142].
 





Mariae filiae et heredi vincae Georgij Blenerhaiset
armigeri filij primogeneti Thomae Blenerhaiset
militis inaurati enuptae primo Thomae Culpeper
Ar'igero qhic: postea Franciso Bacon armigero.
qi  Petistriae in comitat : Suff : tumulatur sine ple :
defuncte . xvij Septemb : 1587. aetatis suae 70
Viduae, piae, castae, Hospitali, Benignae
 
Ioannes Cornwaleis et Ioannes Blenerhaiset
Memoriae et amoris ergo posuerut . 
 
 
 
 
 
Latin Inscription
 
 
 





Mariae filiae et heredi vincae Georgij Blenerhaiset
armigeri ç Thomae Blenerhaiset
militis inaurati enuptae primo Thomae Culpeper
Ar[m]igero q[u]i hic: postea Franciso Bacon armigero.
q[u]i Petistriae in comitat: Suff[olk] tumulatur sine p[ro]le
defuncte . xvij Septemb[bribus] 1587. aetatis suae 70
Viduae, piae, castae, Hospitali, Benignae
 
Ioannes Cornwaleis et Ioannes Blenerhaiset
Memoriae et amoris ergo posuerut .
 
 
 
 

Inscription expanded
 
 
 





Mary, daughter and heir to George Blenerhaysett
esquire the son of Thomas Blenerhaysett
Knight, wife of Thomas Culpeper
Esquire, and afterwards of Francis Bacon esquire
of Pettistree in the County of Suffolk,
who died 17th September 1587 without issue aged 70
a widow, pious, chaste, hospitable

John Cornwaleis and John Blenerhaysett [erected this]
in memory of and with love towards her.

 
 
 

Translated into English
 
 
 
 

NOTE: [BLOMEFIELD v.1 1805, p.143] mis-transcribes by omitting
         a line and making the son a knight, instead of the father.

 
 
 
 
shields of arms on Mary Bacon's tomb at Frenze 1587

 
click on image to enlarge
shield 1
click on image to enlarge
shield 2
 
shield 3
 
shield 4
 
 
click on image to enlarge

lozenge 5








 
 
 

Blennerhassett crest 6
 
 
arms quarterly of 9
 
1. quarterly:      1st & 4th Culpepper                          2nd & 3rd "a chevron engrailed between 11 martlets, 3,2,1,2,3"
                                                                                [FARRER, Frenze p.34] describes this "a semée (semé) of martlets"
    impaling
quarterly of 9:   1st Blennerhassett                            2nd Lowdham                            3rd Kelvedon (Keldon)
                        4th Orton                                         5th Skelton (crescent on fess)     6th Covert (annulet on ermine fess)
                        7th Pelham*                                     8th Echingham                           9th Lowthe ***

NOTE: the sinister quarterings are identical to shields 2. & 5.
 
2.                     Bacon - single (with mullet)
    impaling
quarterly of 9:   1st Blennerhassett                            2nd Lowdham                            3rd Kelvedon (Keldon)
                        4th Orton                                         5th Skelton (crescent on fess)     6th Covert** (anulet on ermine fess)
                        7th Pelham*                                     8th Echingham                           9th Lowthe ***

NOTE: the sinister quarterings are identical to shields 1. & 5.
 
3. quarterly:      1st & 6th Blennerhassett                   2nd Lowdham                            3rd Kelvedon
                        4th Orton                                         5th  Skelton (crescent on fess)

4. quarterly:      1st Covert**(annulet on fess)           2nd Pelham*
                        3rd Echingham                                 4th Lowthe ***

5. lozenge, at centre of slab, quarterly of 9: 
                        1st Blennerhassett                            2nd Lowdham                            3rd Kelvedon (Keldon)
                             4th Orton                                         5th Skelton (crescent on fess)     6th Covert** (annulet on ermine fess)
                        7th Pelham*                                     8th Echingham                           9th Lowthe ***

NOTE: These quarterings identical to sinister side of shields 1 & 2 so, where quartering is unclear, look at other shields...


Colour: Individual shields of arms on this and other monumental brasses at Frenze wouldprobably have been enamelled or otherwise painted in their correct heraldic colours. It is rare for enamelling on a monumental brass to survive and none survives at Frenze. Brass is not a good medium for enamel, temperature change and damp over time causes brass to expand and contract, thus enamel cracks and falls away in small pieces.


*    PELHAM
      arms of Pelham = three pelicans vulning themselves.  vulning (or mining) = wounding itself by biting its own breast.
      This is a word traditionally used of the pelican, which in the past was believed to feed its young with blood drawn from
      its own chest; used both as heraldic motif and as a symbol of Christ.

     - Isabel Covert (nee Pelham) is Mary Blennerhasett Culpeper Bacon's grandmother
 
      NOTE: The Hon. and Right Rev. John Thomas Pelham, Lord Bishop of Norwich, bore these arms
                impaled with arms of the See of Norwich "Azure, three mitres labelled Or"
 
**  COVERT
      arms of Covert = "Gules, a fess ermine between three martlets Or" (annulet on fess for difference)
      but [COTMAN v.2, description p.35] has arms of Duke = "Azure, a fess ermine, between three martlets Argent"
 
        both [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144] [COTMAN v.1, plate 83 description p.43 & v.2, description p.35]
       each in error name these COVERT quarterings as DUKE, but it is not so, they are COVERT.
     - Anne Blennerhassett (nee Covert) is Mary Blennerhassett Culpeper Bacon's mother
     - Isabel Covert (nee Pelham) is Mary Blennerhasett Culpeper Bacon's grandmother
 
*** LOWTHE ??
       both [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144] and [COTMAN v.2, plate 83, description p.43]
        name these quarterings as LOWTHE, but I feel they perhaps should be SUTTON, because Jane Sutton is
       Mary Blennerhassett Culpeper Bacon's grandmother (1st wife of her grandfather Sir Thomas Blennerhassett, Kt)
 
6.   crest: the Blennerhassett crest (above lozenge):
                                           "a fox sejant Gules, on a wreath Argent and Gules"
                                           - the wolf of the Blennerhassett crest was often, in Norfolk & Suffolk, described as a fox

      NOTE: The crest is been made from two pieces of brass, no doubt to reduce wastage of valuable material.
  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

[FARRAR 1887, Frenze IV, pp.34-35]
 

 
 
 


 
 
 
TWO UNIDENTIFIED LEDGER SLABS AT FRENZE
 
["Norfolk Archaeology" v.22, 1926, pp.xxxiv-xxxv] tells us: "Near the south door, and also near the west end, were despoiled slabs."
 
 
The Churches Conservation Trust church guide booklet (August 1996) by Anthony Barnes on p.4 tells us:
 
"At the west end and just inside the door are two slabs with indents for brasses." This is only partially correct - the slab just inside the south door (i.e. the porch door) has indents, for an inscription brass and two brass shields of arms, but the other slab, next to the octagonal font, is plain with no indents and no inscription. Any such that may have once been present were long ago worn away.
 
and continues:
 
"Blomefield reports an earlier historian's record of the inscriptions for Joan (d.1501) and her grandson John (d.1514). One may presume that these two slabs are their memorials." This is possible, but a better candidate for the owner of the indented slab (indents for inscription brass and two shields of arms) may be a Cornwallis-Froxmere connection reported by Blomefield while one of the shields remained in place, i.e.

"Another stone hath its inscription torn off, and one shield; the other [shield] is Cornwaleis impaling Froxmere." [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.143] 


The marriage implied here is between Katherine Cornwallis & Thomas Froxmere, shown below in yellow (as is also a connection with the Blennerhassett family at Frenze). This indented ledger slab may have covered the tomb of Thomas Froxmere, his wife Katherine Froxmere (nee Cornwallis) or perhaps their daughter Anna Cockett (nee Froxmere):             NOTE: we need to know their dates & places of death.

          Thomas Cornwallis
            of Brome, Suffolk
    (b.c1420/1 d.26-May-1484)
                   |
                   ____________________________
                   |                                                 |
          William Cornwallis                       Katherine Cornwallis
               of Brome                                of Brome (b.c1480)
      (b.c1470 d.20-Nov-1519)                          m.
                   m.                             Thomas Froxmere (Foxmere)
     Elizabeth Stanford (Stamford)        of Wych (b.c1475)
            d.1-Apr-1537                                      |
                    |                                                |
                    |                                                |
       Sir John Cornwallis, Kt              Anna Froxmere (Foxmere)
    Steward of the Household to                        m.
Edward Tudor, Prince of Wales              <???> Cockett (Cocket)
      (later King Edward VI)
                    m.
             Mary Sulliard
                    |
                    ________________________________
                    |                                                        |
            Richard Cornwallis                          Elizabeth Cornwallis
    of Shotley & Okenhill Hall,                           m. est.c1535
        Badingham, Suffolk                         John Blennerhassett M.P.
                   m.                                      of Barsham Hall, Suffolk
          Margaret Louthe (Lowthe)       (son of Sir Thomas Blennerhassett Kt
      (dau. & heir of Lionel Louthe                 d.1531, bur. Frenze)
of Sawtrey Beames, Huntingtonshire
& Elizabeth Blennerhassett, dau. of         
Sir Thomas Blennerhassett Kt d.1531)          


 photo: B.J.
 photo: B.J.
unidentified ledger slab 1
at the south (porch) door.
This has indents for an inscription brass & two brass shields of arms

[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.143] writes, perhaps of this stone:
"Another stone hath its inscription torn off, and one shield;
the other [shield] is Cornwaleis (Cornwallis) impaling Froxmere."
unidentified ledger slab 1

 
 
photo: B.J.
photo: B.J.

unidentified ledger slab 2
this is the most westerly of a row of four such slabs in
the centre aisle, next to the font, aligned with N. & S. doors

The inscription is completely lost, worn away, as is any
indent for a brass that may, or may not, have been present
unidentified ledger slab 2
in this photograph the slab is to the right of the font,
 first of a row of 4 such slabs in the centre aisle
 
The other 3 slabs are black marble, covering later Lords of the Manor.
See photo top of page & "Frenze after the Blennerhassetts"

 
 



 
 
THREE ORPHAN BRASS SHIELDS OF ARMS
suspected by Blomefield of having earlier been stolen from Frenze church
 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 180, pp.145-146] tells us:
 "I have now by me three brass shields, which I am apt to think were stolen from this church some time agone; the arms being:
 
 
Shelton impaling "a cross ingrailed ermine"
 
 
Shelton impaling "a fess between fifteen billets, 5,4,3,2,1"
 
 
Paston  impaling  Shelton
 
 

 
 




 
    
COATS OF ARM

of families related to the Blennerhassetts of Frenze Norfolk & Barsham Suffolk

with particular reference to quarterings on shields of arms decorating the ledger slab for Mary Blennerhassett Culpeper Bacon (d.1587)
 
 Blennerhassett
 (Bleverhassett, Hassett):
"Gules, a chevron ermine, between three dolphins embowed Argent",
in Norfolk & Suffolk there is often an annulet for difference

Mary Blennerhassett
Culpeper Bacon d.1587
Bacon (of Hesset, Norfolk):
"Argent, on a fesse engrailed between three escutcheons, Gules, three mullets Or pierced sable", a mullet for difference
 
Francis Bacon
(2nd husband of
Mary Blennerhassett
Culpeper Bacon d.1587)
Baynard:
"Argent, a chevron between three birds, Sable"
 
 
 Braham:
"Sable a cross formée fleury or"
Margaret Braham
 (2nd wife of Sir Thomas
Blennerhassett, Kt d.1531,
the grandfather of
Mary Blennerhassett
Culpeper Bacon d.1587)
 Buckle:
"Or, a chevron between three buckles"
 
 
 Calthorpe (Calthorp):
"Checky Or and Azure, a fess ermine"
 
 Cornwallis:
 
 
 
 Cotton:
 
 
 
 Covert:
"Gules, a fess ermine between three martlets Or" (annulet on fess for difference)
 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805, p.144] and [COTMAN v.2, plate 83, description p.43]
both, in error, name the Blennerhassett COVERT quarterings as DUKE, but not so:
     - Anne COVERT Blennerhassett is Mary Blennerhassett Culpeper Bacon's mother
     - Isabel PELHAM Covert is Mary Blennerhasett Culpeper Bacon's grandmother
Anne Covert
(mother of
Mary Blennerhassett
Culpeper Bacon d.1587)
 Culpepper (Culpeper):
"Argent, a bend engrailed Gules"
 
Thomas Culpeper
(1st husband of
Mary Blennerhassett
Culpeper Bacon d.1587)
 Dalimer:
 
 
 
 Duke:
"Azure, a fess ermine, between three martlets Argent"
                 this looks likenCovert - check this ???
 
George Duke
(uncle of Mary Blennerhassett Culpeper Bacon d.1587)
 Echingham:
"Azure, fretty Argent"

In heraldry a fret is a charge consisting of two narrow bendlets placed in saltire, interlaced with a mascle.  fretty (or fretté) as here in the Echingham arms is a continuous fret, forming a pattern for diapering the field.

Mary Echingham
(aunt of Mary Blennerhassett Culpeper Bacon d.1587)
 Froxmere:
perhaps "Sable, a bend between two arms extended, Argent" ??
 
 
 Heigham:
"Sable, a fess cheequé Or and Azure, between three horse's heads erased Argent"
 
 
 Ilketshall:
 
 
 
 Jenney:
"Ermine, a bend Gules cotised Or"
 
 
 Jernegan:
 
 
Margaret Jernegan (2nd wife of George Blennerhassett,
father of Mary Blennerhassett
Culpeper Bacon d.1587)
 Kelvedon (Keldon):
"Gules, a pall reversed ermine"
 
Essex
 Kemp:
"Gules, three garbs within bordure engrailed, Or"
 
 Mortimer of Wigmore
 
 
 
 Le Strange (L'Estrange):
"Gules, two lions passant guardant Argent"
 
Jane Le Strange (L'Estrange),
perhaps (?) the 1st wife of
of Sir Thomas
Blennerhassett, Kt d.1531
(The alternative is Jane Sutton - both uncertain)
 Leiston:
 
 
 
 Lowdham (Loudham):
"Argent, three escutcheons Sable"
Suffolk & Norfolk
 Lowthe (Lowth):
"Sable, a lion rampant Or, armed Gules"
 
Lionel Lowthe
(uncle of Mary Blennerhassett Culpeper Bacon d.1587)
 Orton:
"Argent, a lion rampant gardent Vert, crowned Or"
 
Cumberland ancestors
of Blennerhassett
 Park:
 
 
 
 Pelham: "Azure, three pelicans Argent, vulning themselves Proper"

vulning (or mining) = wounding itself by biting its own breast.
This is a word traditionally used of the pelican, which in the past was believed to feed its young with blood drawn from its own chest; used both as heraldic motif
and as a symbol of Christ.

NOTE: The Hon. and Right Rev. John Thomas Pelham, Lord Bishop of Norwich,
          bore these arms impaled with
          arms of the See of Norwich "Azure, three mitres labelled Or"
Isabel Pelham,
grandmother of
Mary Blennerhassett
Culpeper Bacon d.1587

(i.e. mother of Anne Covert, 1st wife of Mary's father
George Blennerhassett)
 Playters:
"Argent, three bends wavy Azure"
 
 
 Rede (Read):
"Azure, on a bend wavy Or, three moorcocks Sable, with a bordure engrailed Argent pellete, a crescent Ermine"
NOTE: a pellete/pellet = a roundlet or gunstone
 
 
 Reydon (Roydon):
"Chequy Argent and Gules, a cross Azure"
 
 
 Scales:
"Gules, six escallops Argent, three, two, one"
 
 
 Shelton:
 
 
 
 Skelton:
"Azure, on a fess Gules between three fleur-de-lys or",
a crescent Gules/Sable for difference
 
Cumberland ancestors
of Blennerhassett
 Tindall (Tyndall):
"Argent, a fess dancettee/indented Gules, in chief three crescents of the second"
 
 
 Tye:
"Argent, a bend between six cross crosslets fitche Sable"
 
 
 Throckmorton
 (Frockmorton, Frogmorton):
 
"Gules, on a chevron Argent three bars gemelles Sable"
 
 Ufford:
 
 
 
 Wingfield:
"Argent, on a bend Gules cotised Sable three pairs of wings cojoined in lure Argent"

 
 
"Sable, a bend engrailed between two cotises or"
 
appears with Blennerhassett
in "Visitation of Suffolk 1561"
     
"a chevron between 11 martlets, 3,2,1,2,3"

[FARRER, Frenze p.34] describes this "a semée (semé) of martlets"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
THE FOLLOWING ARMS WERE IN ANCIENT STAINED GLASS FORMERLY AT FRENZE:
 
 
 
"Or, a fess Gules"
 
 
 
"Gules on a chief Argent 2 mullets of the field, pierced Sable"
 
 
 
"Or a fess Gules" (impaling Scales)
 
 
 
"Azure, on a chief Gules 3 leopards faces Or, mascule Or and Sable"
                         (impaled by Lowdham)
 
 
 
 
 


 
MEDIEVAL STAINED AND PAINTED GLASS AT FRENZE
 
  photo: B.J.
 photo:B.J.
  photo: B.J.
 
 
photo: courtesy Flickr

 

Surviving fragments of stained and painted glass reinstated in the east window.
The west and south windows contain no coloured glass.
 
Frenze church at one time boasted a considerable quantity of heraldic stained glass, Blomefield writing in his 1st edition:
"In the windows are arms and funeral escutcheons of the Hassetts, &c. most of which still remain." [BLOMEFIELD 1st ed. v.2 1781, p.123].
Since then almost all the heraldic glass reported by Blomefield has been lost, only the fragments in these photographs remaining in the .
 
The Frenze church guide booklet of est. c1990 by "H.M.S." tells us: "There are six windows in the Church, the glass is all plain, except for a few fragments of coloured glass in the East window. It is said that in the hail storm of 1947 over 90 panes of glass were broken." (who is H.M.S.?)
 
The Churches Conservation Trust church guide booklet (August 1996) by Anthony Barnes on p.2 tells us: "There used to be a considerable quantity of heraldic stained glass, but almost all of it has now gone" and "A number of panes of glass record the names of glaziers carrying out repairs, one even mentioning the weather on the day he did the work."
 
The 1st edition of Blomefield does not list the ancient glass in detail but the 2nd edition [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 180, p.145] gives descriptions, as follows, and tells us "Most of these arms still remain in the windows":
 
In a north window:
1. a man bearing Ufford's arms, and by him stood pictured a lady in the arms of Shelton, covered with a mantle of Lowdham.
 
NOTE: Blomefield is here repeating what had been recorded previously by Anstis [ANSTIS Ms. A.23. f.222][ANSTIS Ms. E.26. f.23]
In the next window:
2.(quarterly?): "Or, a fess Gules", Blennerhassett, Scales;
 
3. many funeral escutcheons for Hassett (i.e. Blennerhassett);
 
4. funeral escutcheon for Catherine, wife to Thomas Froxmere, Gentleman
 
In the windows:
5. quarterly: Hassett (i.e. Blennerhassett) and Lowdham.
    Lowdham being: 1st Lowdham, 2nd Ufford, 3rd Dalimer, 4th Lowdham ("Argent, 3 escutcheons Gules" instead of "Argent 3 escutcheons Sable")
 
6. (quarterly?): Shelton, "Mortimer of Wigmore", Ufford - with a label
 
7. (quarterly?): Shelton, "Mortimer of Wigmore", Ufford - with a fleur-de-lys
 
8. (quarterly?): Shelton, "Mortimer of Wigmore", Ufford - with a batoon gobonne Argent and Gules
 
9. (quarterly?): Shelton, "Mortimer of Wigmore", Ufford - with an annulet Argent
 
In the west window:
10. Lowdham impaling Bacon (Gules, on a chief Argent two mullets of the field, pierced Sable)
 
11. "Or a fess Gules" impaling Scales
 
12. Lowdham impaling "Azure, on a chief Gules three leopards faces Or, mascule Or and Sable"
                                 NOTE: mascule or mascle = a perforated lozenge
 
Warning NOTE: Need to examine document at the [BL] as follows:
                "Plan, in pen and ink, with three sketches of windows, the south door, and a "recess for the elements of the altar," in Frenze Church;
                drawn in July 1814, by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich: each 6in. x 4in. [BL Add. Ms. 6755 ff.125-128]"

 



INSCRIPTION ON THE CHURCH BELL AT FRENZE
 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805 p.142] tells us: '...having no steeple, the bell hangs on the outside of the roof, at the west end."
 
The Frenze church guide booklet of est. c1990 by "H.M.S." tells us: (who is H.M.S.?)
 
"A wooden bell cote which contains one bell weighing 75lbs., inscribed "John Goldsmith made mee 1707,"
standson the West end of the tiled roof. A small stone cross stands over the East end."

The Churches Conservation Trust church guide booklet (August 1996) by Anthony Barnes on p.2 tells us:
 "The roof was repaired in 1900, when a new wooden bellcot was built a little further east from the old one,
 all on the instructions of the Patron, Edward (later Sir Edward) Mann." also "The bell is by John Goldsmith of Redgrave, 1707."
 


 
 
BLENNERHASSETT EAST ANGLIAN FAMILY CONNECTIONS
ANCIENT HERALDIC WALL HANGING ON PAINTED CANVAS
 
THIS CANVAS, NOW LOST, MAY HAVE COME FROM FRENZE OR BARSHAM
is there any other record of this canvas?
 
An ancient canvas wall hanging, painted with the arms of Blennerhassett and their intermarriages in Norfolk & Suffolk, was seen "surrounding two rooms" at a house at Caister, near Yarmouth, Norfolk by Francis Blomefield when gathering material for his "History of Norfolk" est. c1745. The arms are listed below in the sequence recorded by Blomefield.
 
The canvas had belonged to John Blennerhassett (d.1704), last of Blennerhassett name in Norfolk.
"At Mrs. Hill's, at Castor, near Yarmouth, Mr Blomefield saw an ancient canvass surrounding two rooms, painted with the matches of the Bleverhassets: John Bleverhasset, who married a sister of the said Mrs. Hill, and died in 1704, was the last now living of this branch of that family; their names are under each coat, but with hanging against moist walls several are worn out; those that are perfect we have added here, though they are so displaced that the time of the matches cannot be determined by their succession. - Bleverhasset impaled with all the following coats:"
[BLOMEFIELD 1st ed. v.2 1781 pp.123-124]. Similar wording appears in [BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed. v.1 1805 p.146] followed by the list below:
 
Bleverhasset (Blennerhassett):
"Gules, a chevron ermine between three dolphins embowed Argent"
 
crest: "on a wreath Argent and Gules, a fox sejant Gules"
 
 
 Impaled with all the following coats:
 
Frogmorton
(Frockmorton, Throckmorton):
"Gules, on a chevron Argent three bars gemelles Sable"
 
Braham:
as in p.134  "Sable a cross formée fleury Or"
 
Tindall (Tyndall):
"Argent, a fess indented in chief three crescents Gules"
 
Eyre:
"Argent, on a fess, ----- three trefoils Or"
 
Pickerell:
as in p.48  "Sable, a swan proper, a chief ermine"
 
Clopton:
"Sable, a bend Argent cotized, indented Or"
 
Lowthe (Lowth):
"Sable, a lion rampant Or, armed Gules"

Cressi (Cressett): "Argent, three beacons Sable"
 
Culpepper:
"Argent, a bend ingrailed Gules"
 
Covert:
"Gules, a fess between three lions heads Or" (incorrect, should be: "Gules, a fess ermine between three martlets Or")
 
Baynaugh:
"Gules, a chevron between three bull's faces Or"
 
Brampton:
"Gules, a saltre between four crosslets fitchee Argent"
 
Meawes (Meux):
"Pally of 6, Or and Argent on a chief Gules three crosslets formy of the first"
 
Lowdham (Loudham):
as in p.134  "Argent, three escutcheons Sable"
 
Kelvedon (Keldon):
"Gules, a pall reversed ermine"
 
Orton:
"Argent, a lion rampant guardant Vert, crowned Or"
 
Skelton:
"Azure, on a fess Gules between three de-lises (fleur de lys) Or", a crescent Sable for difference
 
Cornwaleis (Cornwallis):
 
 
Hare:
 
 
Heydon:
 
 
Wyngfield (Wingfield):
 
 
Reape (error for Reade/Read):
 
 
Kempe (Kemp):
 
 
Gosnold:
 
 
Spilman (Spelman):
 
 
Colby:
 
 
Alcock (Cock):
 
 
Rowse (Rous):
 
 
Drury:
 
 
Hubbard (Hobart):
 
 
Heigham:
"Sable, a fess cheequé Or and Azure, between three horse's heads erased Argent"
 
Warner, quartering Whetnall:
 
 
Calthorp (Calthorpe, Calthrop):
 
 
Lovell (Love? Lavile?):
 
 
Ruthyn:
 
 
 
coats of arms above in sequence as listed by Blomefield.

NOTE: John Blennerhassett married Elizabeth Rowe; her sister Mary Rowe married Edward Hill.




Sources for Monumental Brass in Norfolk & Suffolk
 
[VoS] "The Visitation of Suffolk 1561" part II, p.358
edited by by Joan Corder 1984, published by The Harleian Society, New Series, v.3, 1984
 
[LE NEVE] Peter Le Neve (1661-1729), English Herald and Antiquary.
    Author of "Le Neve's Monuments"
    Among his many archives is: "Collections for a history of Norfolk and Suffolk" with Ms. additions by Thomas Martin,
    held in the Suffolk Record Office, Ipswich [Le NEVE: HD 1538/32, NRA 39544] and doors in
 
[ANSTIS] John Anstis (1669-1744), Garter Principal King of Arms from 1718, Norfolk Herald, Antiquarian and writer on heraldry. 
    Sadly his papers are widely dispersed after being sold at auction in 1768 and 1774.
    Collections are held at the British Library Department of Manuscripts [BL], the Bodleian Library, [BODLEIAN] and All Souls College, Oxford.
    Anstis Ms. references to monumental brass effigies & inscriptions at Frenze & Kenninghall are mentioned by [BLOMEFIELD] as:
 
          ANSTIS Ms. A 23 f.222 (in Blomefield 2nd Ed.1805 at Frenze p.145)
          ANSTIS Ms. G 6   f.39  (in Blomefield 1st  Ed.1781 at Frenze p.121; 2nd Ed.1805 at Frenze p.142)
          ANSTIS Ms. E 26 f.23   (in Blomefield 2nd Ed.1805 at Frenze p.144 & 145)
          ANSTIS Ms. E 26 f.29   (in Blomefield 2nd Ed.1805 at Kenninghall p.224)

    NOTE: Papers of John Anstis now at the British Library [BL] Department of Ms. are the result of several different donations/acquisitions so they
              are not stored or catalogued as a coherent collection. The British Museum/British Library numbering system for these does not relate in
              any way to the library shelf numbering used by John Anstis and I have failed to identify these Frenze/Kenninghall references as documents
              at the [BL]Warning Perhaps these are to be found in the Bodleian Library, Oxford...

[BLOMEFIELD] Francis Blomefield A.M., F.S.A. (1705-1752), historian of Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire.
    Author of "Essay Towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk"
    1st edition compiled c1739-75 (v.1 1739, v.2 1745, v.3 1769-75).
                    The villages of Frenze and Kenninghall are in v.2, compiled 1745, published 1781.
    2nd edition published 1805-10. Frenze and Kenninghall are in v.1, published 1805.

[FARRER] Rev Edmund Farrer (1848-1945) Rector of Hinderclay, Suffolk.
                 Author of "The Church Heraldry of Norfolk: a description of all coats of arms on brasses, monuments, slabs, hatchments, &c.,
                 now to be found in the county, illustrated, with references to Blomefield's History of Norfolk and Burke's Armory,
                 together with notes from the inscriptions attached" by Rev.Edmund Farrer F.S.A.  v.1 1885-7,   v.2 1889,   v.3 1893.
                 Frenze is in v.1 pp.33-35.
 
[KERRICH] Rev. Thomas Kerrich M.A. (1748–1828), Principal Librarian of the University of Cambridge (Protobibliothecarius), antiquary, antiquarian illustrator.
                                                                                Prebendary of the Cathedrals of Wells and Lincoln, Vicar of Dersingham,Norfolk
                                                                   
    At the [BL Department of Manuscripts] are his drawings of effigies in Frenze Church, listed in:
    "Catalogue of the Manuscript Maps, Charts, and Plans and of the Topographical Drawings in the British Museum" v.2 1894, pp.66-67, as:
 
   "Plan, in pen and ink, with three sketches of windows, the south door, and a "recess for the elements of the altar," in Frenze Church;
    drawn in July 1814, by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich: each 6in. x 4in. [BL Add. Ms. 6755 ff.125-128]"
 
   "Three sketches, in pen and ink, of the octogonal stone font in Frenze Church;
     drawn by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich, in July, 1814: each 6in. x 4in. [BL Add. Ms. 6755 ff.129-131]"
 
   "South-west view, in pen and ink, of Frenze Church;
    drawn by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich: 6in. x 4in. [BL Add. Ms. 6755 f.356]"

   "Plan, in pen and ink, with measurements, of Frenze Church;
    drawn by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich: 6in. x 4in. [BL Add. Ms. 6755 f.358]"

   "Seven sketches, in pen and ink, of windows and doors in Frenze Church;
    drawn by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich: each 6in. x 4in. [BL Add. Ms. 6755 ff.359-365]"
 
   "An outline drawing, in pen and ink, of the monumental brass effigies of Ralph Bleverhasset, Esq., (who died in 1475,) in Frenze Church;
    drawn by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich: 8in. x 6in. [BL Add. Ms. 6728 fol.217]"
 
   "Sketch, in pen and ink, of the sepulchral figure of John Bleverhasset, Esq., (who died in 1510,) in Frenze Church;
    drawn in 1769 by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich: 6in. x 4in. [BL Add. Ms. 6728 fol.232]"
 
   "Sketch, in pen and ink, of the sepulchral figure of Sir Thomas Bleverhasset, (who died in 1531,) in Frenze Church;
    drawn in 1769 by the Rev. Thomas Kerrich;
   'N.B. July, 1814, I was again in Frenze Church, and found that this figure had been stolen:' 6in. x 4in. [BL Add. Ms. 6728 fol.250]"
 
     NOTE: Rev. Kerrich married Sophia Hayles.
               Many of his paintings and drawings were subsequently etched by his sister-in-law Jane C. Hayles (active 1792-1804), her prints published.
 
[DAVY] David Elisha Davy (1769-1851), Suffolk antiquarian whose collections remain unpublished.
    The Davy Collection of Suffolk Mss. at the British Library [BL Add. Ms. 19077-19247] is the result of many years labour,
    compiled in anticipation of a definitive "History of Suffolk" that sadly remains unpublished.

[COTMAN] John Sell Cotman (1782-1842), marine artist, antiquarian illustrator; Lived at Great Yarmouth 1812-1823.
    see "The Life of John Sell Cotman" 1937; "The Etchings of John Sell Cotman" in "The Print Collectors'  Quarterly" Oct.1922.
    Published a set of 60 etchings of ancient buildings in Norfolk, published in ten parts between 1812 and 1818.
    author of:
    "Engravings of the Most remarkable of the Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk and Suffolk" (J.Keymer, Norfolk 1817)
    "Sepulchral brasses in Norfolk" (Henry G. Bohn, London 1819).
 
    "Engravings of Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk" 1838, Henry G. Bohn London
    "Engravings of Sepulchral Brasses in Suffolk" 1838, Henry G. Bohn London
 
    "Engravings of Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk & Suffolk" combined 2 volume 2nd ed. (with additional plates) 1839, Henry G. Bohn London
     Plates in the 2nd ed. related to the Blennerhassett family are:
    John Blennerhassett                        at Frenze,  1510  2nd ed. v.1 p.29 pl.50
    Jane Blennerhassett                        at Frenze,  ????   2nd ed. Appendix p.60 pl.5
    Sir Thomas Blenerhaysett, Kt           at Frenze   1531  2nd ed. v.1 p.35 pl.63 & v.2 frontispiece pl.63
    Mary Blenerhaysett/Culpeper/Bacon at Frenze   1587  2nd ed. v.1 1839 2nd ed. p.35 pl.83
    Joan Braham                                  at Frenze   1519  2nd ed. v.1 p.30 pl.53
    Ann Blenerhaysett/Rede                  at Norwich 1577  2nd ed. v.1 p.42 pl.80
    Peter Rede                                     at St Peter Mancroft, Norwich 1568 2nd ed. p.? pl.?
    Sir Edward Warner                          at ???        1565  2nd ed. v.1 p.40 pl.76
    John Spelman                                 at ???        1581  2nd ed. v.1 p.42 pl.81
 
[L'ESTRANGE] John L'Estrange (1836-1887). Editor of "Eastern Counties Collectanea, being Notes and Queries
    on subjects relating to Norfolk, Sufolk, Essex and Cambridge" 1872-73; Frenze is on pp.265-267.
 
[MORIARTY] George Andrews Moriarty, F.S.A. (1883-1968), known as G. Andrews Moriarty, of Ogunquit, Maine, USA;
    author of:
    "Blennerhassett Family Arms” ["The New England Historical and Genealogical Register" v.98 No.1 Jan.1944, whole number 389, p.95] v.98 No.1 Jan.1944, p.95]
     "Genealogical Research in England, East Anglian Blennerhassets [NEHGR v.98 No.3 July 1944, whole number 391, p.273]
    This last contains helpful discussion of the descent of Ralph Blennerhassett in Norfolk from the Cumberland Blennerhassett family,
 
[GOUGH] Richard Gough (1735-1809) antiquarian. Author of "Sepulchural Monuments of Great Britain" part 1 v.1 1786, part 2 v.2 1796-9
 
[MBS] Monumental Brass Society - publications containing references to brasses at Frenze, Norfolk are:
                    Transactions:
                    vol 1     part ix p.19
                    vol 4     pp.220-221,331
                    vol 7     p.128
                    vol 9     pp.118,133,134,137
                    vol 10   pp.317,465
                    vol 11   pp.274,435
                    vol 12   pp.231,297
                    vol 13   pp.62,66,67,430,431-432,465
                    vol 14   pp.55-57,283-284,296
                    vol 15   pp.75,155,504
                    vol 16   pp.108,181-184,517,530,536,540,543
 
                    Bulletins (published three times a year):
                    No.13   p.22
                    No.48   p.321
                    No.49   p.333
                    No.50   1980, p.358 (re: palimpsest)
                    No.61   p.21
                    No.63   p.61
                    No.64   Oct.1993, pp.75-77 "The Frenze Palimpsest"
                    No.77   p.351
                    No.115 September 2010, pp.294-5, "Brass in Glass" by Jane Houghton and Janet Whitham
                    No.???  February 2011, p.319 (book review, re: palimpsest)

                    Illustrations:
                    II   T12  p.297 (detail)
                    III  T16  p.183
                    IV  T16  p.106
                    V   T16  p.184
                    VI  T13  p.470
                    VII T13  p.63, Bulletin No.64 p.75 (rev.)
                    X    T14  p.56
 
                    "Brass of the Month" March 2011 - "Ralph Blenerhaysett, 1475, Frenze, Norfolk" by Jon Bayliss
 
 
 



 
(Sir Thomas Blenerhaysett Kt and his two wives) 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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