Blennerhassett Family Tree
Genealogy one-name study - by Bill Jehan
   Introduction      History      Lordship of the Manor of BH - history
 
Lordship of the Manor of Blennerhasset
in Allerdale, Cumberland
 as it passed through different hands
 
Unlike the family name, the manor and village of Blennerhasset is by modern convention spelled with a single 't'

shown as a Pedigree of the Lords of Allerdale, in Cumbria
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Lordships of the Manor are among the oldest titles in Britain, pre-dating the Norman conquest of England in 1066. A county would contain within its borders many small Manors, each with a Manor House or Hall (often fortified) and surrounding village. Manors were the pivot of the English feudal system and in mediaeval times the “Lord of the Manor” possessed rights & privileges attached not to himself but to the land he held. These included the right to dispense justice through a manorial court. Manors were usually small and held individually, but some prominent men held many manors, using this landholding as a measure of their status.
 
The manor of Blennerhassett was in Alnerdal (Allerdale), the northern part of ancient Cumbria, close to the border with lowland Scotland. Cumbria was then held by the Earl of Northumbria and at the Norman conquest was not yet part of England, so not accounted for in Domesday Book. 
 
In 1072 William the Conqueror took from the Saxon Earl Gospatric (I) his Earldom of Northumbria and exiled him to Scotland, giving all of ancient Cumbria to Ranulf (Ranulph) de Meschins and all the land of Copeland between the rivers Dutton and Derwent to William Meschins, brother of Ranulf. NOTE: From Gospatric (I) the Cumberland town Aspatria, near Blennerhasset, takes its name.
 
Gospatric (I) had a son Waldeof or Waldeif (Waldeve in English) who was later able to recover most of his ancestral estates in Cumberland & Westmorland, being granted by Ranulf de Meschins the whole of the Barony of Alnerdal (Allerdale) between the rivers Wampool and Derwent; and by William de Meschins, Lord of Copeland, all lands between the rivers Cocker and Derwent.
 
This son Waldeof, became first Lord of Allerdale below Derwent, which he held of the King by service of cornage. His son Alan FitzWaldeof, second Lord of Allerdale, was benefactor of the Cistercian Abbey of St.Mary, Holm Cultram, restoring the monastery founded by King Henry I (1100-1135) and giving to it one third of the manor of Holm Cultram (a.k.a. Abbeyholme or Abbeytown). Alan gave the Manor of Blenerhayset (Blennerhasset), with Upmanby (then called Ukmanby or Uckmanby), to his brother-in-law Ranulf (Ranulph) de Lindsey, on the occasion of Ranulf's marriage to Alan's sister Ethelreda (Octreda, Octhreda, Hectreda). Ranulf was from that time styled "Lord of Blennerhasset and Upmanby", and from his family the property passed to the de Mulcasters, who held Blennerhasset for a long time. 
 
Ancient Cumbria over time became the English counties of Cumberland and Westmorland, these recombined in the mid-20th century as the modern English county of Cumbria.
 
BLENNERHASSET HALL

"Blennerhasset Hall", originally the medieval manor house, is now a farm <need photograph>. Until the 18th Century tenants of Blennerhasset manor paid an ancient annual rent of £23, and arbitrary fines, also heriots on the widow's death as well as on the death of the tenant, and several boons and services, viz: “...one day mowing, shearing, ploughing, meadows dressing, and two days leading coals...

Miscellaneous documents relating to Blennerhasset Manor are held by Cumbria Archive Centre, Carlisle [Ref: D/MBS 9/4/1, D LAW/1/72, D/Law 2/15 (NRA36260) etc]. Among the Lawson estate papers is "Manor of Blennerhasset: Colored (sic) Tracing of Plan" [Ref: D LAW/1/72/3]. This is described as a tracing c1900 from an early 19th century plan, 127x 87 (cm?), scale 4 chains to 1 inch, with "Field names, acreages, tenure, name of previous owner; abutting owners; fields coloured blue or yellow; also shows the River Ellen, roads, Fitz, Blennerhasset Village (mostly in hand), Harby Brow, Cock bridge, Aldersceugh."
 
Blennerhasset manor is sometimes described as "Baggrow - Manor of Blennerhasset and Upmanby". Cumbria Archive Centre also has documents relating to Upmanby Manor [Ref: DMBS 9/4/1, SC 6/1144/13, D HUD 9/12/4 etc]


BLENNERHASSET TITHES AND THE CHURCH OF TORPENHOW

"The church of Torpenhow was given by Sibella de Valoniis and Eustachius D'Estoteville, to the prior and convent of Rossdale, in Yorkshire, to whom it was appropriated; but by an award made in the year 1290, by Bishop Irton, the glebe, &c. of Torpenhow, and the great tithes of Torpenhow, Threapland, Aldersceugh, Applewray, Snittlegarth, Bellasis, and Bowaldeth, were assigned to the vicar, for the maintenance of three priests and one sub-deacon: some of these tithes were granted by Queen Elizabeth in 1562, to Cicely Pickrell, and the remainder, in 1574, to John Sonky and Percival Gunson. These tithes belonged to the vicar till the late enclosure act, under which lands were given in lieu of them. The tithes of Bothill and Blennerhasset, which were reserved to the priory of Rossdale, were granted tothe Salkelds, and were held till lately with the Whitehall estate. Under the inclosure act an allotment was given in lieu of the tithes of Bothill. Mr Charlton has sold the great tithes of Blennerhasset to Mr Hodgson, of that place; the small tithes belong to the vicar of Torpenhow. The great tithes of the manor of Kirkland belong to the land owners. In 1807 an act of parliament passed for inclosing those in the town-ship of Threapland (Threapland-town Green excepted); and in 1814 an act for inclosing lands in the manor of Bowaldeth. The Bishop of Carlisle is patron of the vicarage, which is in the deanery of Allerdale."
[LYSONS Magna Britannia, 1816 v.4 Cumberland p.162].
 
 
 

 
 
 
MANOR OF BLENNERHASSET
Allerdale, Cumberland
 
 
LORD OF BLENNERHASSET
HISTORY
Crinan "the Thane" of Northumbria
 
Mormaer of Atholl
Abthane of Dule 
Hereditary Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, Perthshire
Steward of the Western Isles (of Scotland)
b.c966, son of Duncan, Abbot of Dunkeld, Perthshire; d.1045, killed in battle at Dunkeld
 
married c1008 Bethoc (Beatrice, Beatrix), Princess of Scotland, heiress of Scone, b.c984 Angus, Scotland
daughter of Malcolm II, last king of Scots of the line of Kenneth MacAlpine; King of Strathclyde 990; King of Scots 1005; he frequently invaded northern England; born c954 (or 958?); d.25-November-1034, murdered at Glamis Castle
 
Crinan had sons Duncan I the Gracious, King of Scotland 1034-1040 and Maldred, of Scotland:
Maldred of Scotland
Lord of Carlisle
Regent of Strathclyde
 
Feudal Lord of the Barony of Alnerdal (Allerdale) which lands included the manor of Blennerhasset; thus he is the first known Lord of the manor of Blennerhasset
b.c1004 (or c1004-1009?) at Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
 
d.1045 with his father, killed in battle at Dunkeld
 
married c1030 Edith (Ealdgyth, Aldgyth, Algitha) of Northumbria;
b.c1015/18, dau. of Uctred "the Bold" (1st Earl of Northumbria & Earl of Bamburgh, who was assassinated by Cnut 1016), by his 3rd wife Elgiva (Aelgifu), the daughter of Aethelred II "the Redeless" (King of England 979-1013 & 1014-16 and ggg.son of Alfred the Great)
 
Maldred's heir was Gospatric (I) "the Earl"
Gospatric (I) "the Earl", of Scotland
1st Earl of Northumberland
Thane of Dunbar (not Earl of Dunbar)
Earl of Lothian
Lord of Bamburgh
from Gospatric the town of Aspatria, Cumberland (located near to the manor of Blennerhasset) takes its name
 
d.15-December-1072 (1075?) at Ubbanford (Urbanford), Norham, Northumberland
he married 1st Aethelreda, Princess of England
 
he married 2nd to "a sister of Edmund"
 
among his sons by his first wife were:
Gospatric (II) de Dunbar (Gospatric Comes) 2nd Earl of Northumberland, b.c1070, d.23-August-1138, killed at the "Battle of the Standard"
and
Waldeof, 1st Lord of Allerdale below Derwent, Cumberland
 
 
NOTE: the earliest known mention of Blennerhasset as a placename occurs in 1118
 
Waldeof (Waldeif, or Waldeve in English)
 
1st Lord (Baron) of Allerdale below Derwent, Cumberland 
 
witness to the Inquisito Davidas 1116; living 1156
 
did not succeed his father but was independently granted the Barony of Allerdale below Derwent (between the rivers Wampool and Derwent) by Ranulf de Meshines.
he was also granted all the land between the rivers Cocker & Derwent, by William de Meschines, Lord of Copeland
 
He held Allerdale of the King, by service of Cornage
 
he gave lands in Allerdale to his sisters Octreda & Maud; and to his brother-in-law Orme (son of Ketel), Lord of Seaton and husband of his half-sister Gunilda, he gave the manors of Camerton & Flemby (now Flimby)
 
he married Sigrida (Sigrid, Sigarith), dau. of Styr, son of Ulf
his heir was Alan FitzWaldeof, 2nd Lord of Allerdale below Derwent
Alan FitzWaldeof
2nd Lord (Baron) of Allerdale below Derwent
 
 
living 1139
 
Allonby (now a chapelry in Bromfield parish) is believed to be named for him, not (as is sometimes said) from "by the River Ellen"
 
he gave the Manors of Blennerhasset and Upmanby (Uckmanby, Ukmanby) in Allerdale, as dowry for his sister Ethelreda (Octreda, Hectreda) on her marriage to Ranulf (Ranulph, Radulph, Radulf) de Lindsay
Ranulph (Radulph, Radulf, Ralph) de Lindsay
Lord of the manors of Blennerhasset and Upmanby in Allerdale
"Lord of Blennerhasset and Upmanby" temp. Henry II (1154-89), gained as dowry on his marriage to Ochtreda, sister of Alan FitzWaldeof
 
Edward the King’s son was crowned King Edward I at Westminster Abbey on 19-August-1274
 
Blennerhasset passed, by inheritance, to Nicholas Stuteville (Stutevile):
 
NOTE: the earliest known mention of de Blenerhayset as a surname occurs about this time, when a lady <???> de Blenerhayset married John de Newbiggin, 3rd son of Laurence de Newbiggin & <???> Wharton. This Laurence de Newbiggin granted lands to the Abbey of St.Mary, Holm Cultram, temp. Henry II (1154-89) [Cal. Pat. Rolls p.254], [N&B vol.1 p.365 & 370], [BROWNE p.1]
 
The next mention is Waldeve (a.k.a. Baldwin) de Blenerhayset, whose son Alan de Blenerhayset was pardoned in 1270 “…at the instance of Edward the King’s son, for causing the death of another, and for any consequent outlawry…”
[Cal. Pat. Rolls p.446].
Nicholas Stuteville (Stutevile)
son of Robert de Stuteville (b.c1110 d.1183) and Helwise de Murdac (b.c1140)
 
Nicholas Stuteville held Blennerhasset temp. Richard I (1189-1199);
he married 1st <???> having two sons; married 2nd Gunnora d'Aubigny (dsp)
 
d.30-March-121?; the manor of Blennerhasset passed, by inheritance, to William Ousby (de Ulfesby, Ulvesby), alias Piercy:
 
NOTE: Stuteville is a Northumberland family, of the barony of Lydall
William Ousby (de Ulfesby, Ulvesby), alias Piercy
 
William Ousby (de Ulfesby, Ulvesby), alias Piercy, held Blennerhasset temp. Henry III (1216-72); in 1246-7 he gave his lands to his son Walter (a.k.a. William) Piercy:

NOTE: Ousby is a Northumberland family. In 1200 they were taxed for land in Northumberland [Pipe Roll]; in 1297 Lucker of Northumberland was taxed for land held in Ousby
Walter (a.k.a. William) Piercy
of Torpenhow

       

he held five-sixths of the manor of Torpenhow.
he held Blennerhasset temp. Henry III (1216-72).
 
in 1246-7 (31 Henry III) he gave three carucates of land at Torpenhow, to Sir Robert de Mulcaster, Knt of Hayton, Cumberland [CWWAS, N.S. vol.7, p.244] this seemingly including Blennerhasset
Sir Robert de Mulcaster (Mulcastre), Knt
of Torpenhow
 
Sheriff of Cumberland 1260
of Hayton, Cumberland (fl. 1281-2)
 
Lord of the manor of Torpenhow & Blennerhasset, also of Bryarhill (Brackenhill?)
“...who from 1246-7 (31 Henry III) held five-sixths of the manor of Torpenhow by cornage of Baldwin de Wake" [Cal. i.p.m., 10 Edward I, p.258]

he was “...charged with taking a hind (deer) at Oulton, about Candlemas 1271-2...”

on 18-January-1278 a grant was made <by who?> “...to Robert de Mulcaster and his heirs of a weekly market, on Tuesday, at his manor of Hayton and of a yearly fair there on the vigil, feast and morrow of St. Mary Magdalen, and of free warren in all his demesne lands of Torpenhow, Blennerhasset, Bewaldeth and Ermicetwayth...” [Cal. Charter Rolls, 6 Edward I, p.206]
 
Sir Robert de Mulcaster had three (or perhaps four) sons:
 
1. Sir Walter de Mulcaster (his heir, see immediately below)
2. Sir William de Mulcaster (see below)
3. Robert de Mulcaster who had a son Walter.
4. There may perhaps(?) have been another son, John de Mulcaster
[Plea Rolls de Banco, Hilary, 5-6 Edward III, m.98 dorso]
published in [“The Genealogist”, N.S. vol.7, p.240]
 
“...Sir Robert Mulcaster entailed the Mulcasters' lands to the heirs male, anno 2 Edward I (1273-4), viz Torpenhow, Upmanby, Bolton, Blennerhasset, Boldicks Yeyton (Bolton Gate), Hermethauit (Armathwaite), Millam de Copeland in Cumberland...” [1278 - Cal. Charter Rolls, 6 Edward I, p.206]
 
"...in 1273-4 (2 Edward I) Sir Robert de Mulcaster settled the manors of Bolton, Torpenhow, Blennerhassett & Bewaldeth on his eldest son Walter, from whom it passed to Walter’s brother William..." [N&B vol.2 p.125].
NOTE: [N&B vol.2 p.121] has this differently, stating the property passed to Robert’s son William, then to William’s son Walter
 
the manor of Blennerhasset passed to his eldest son Sir Walter de Mulcaster, Knt:
Sir Walter de Mulcaster, Knt
of Arthuret
 
Knight of the Shire (MP) for Cumberland 1290 

married Joan (Johanna), who held three bovates of land at Arthuret, all tenants by cornage [Cal. i.p.m., 28 Edward I, p.448]

he “...held land of Baldwin de Wake..” at North Easton, Arthuret & Stubhill in 1281-2 [Cal. i.p.m., 10 Edward I] also Bolton, Torpenhow, Blennerhasset & Bewaldeth settled on him by his father in 1273-4

he succeeded to the settled estates [Cal. Doc. Scot. vol.2, p.34] but died without issue, succeeded by his brother Sir William de Mulcaster, Knt:

Sir William de Mulcaster, Knt 
of Torpenhow
 
Sheriff of Cumberland 1298 & 1304 (31 Edward I)
 
Knight of the Shire (MP) for Cumberland 1309 & 1311
 
living 1285; of Torpenhow
he also held the manor of Hayton in Aspatria, Blennerhasset and Upmanby, by cornage [<document?> 33 Edward I, p.219]
 
the King committed to him for life the manor of Bolton, 1300
[Cal. Pat. Rolls, 28 Edward I p.259]
in 1316 William de Mulcaster granted to Henry de Maltun, with other lands, “...a certain cultura of Und. in Blennerhasset called “Le Fyche” (or “Le Maston Fittes”)
[Catalog of Ancient Deeds”, vol.6, p.82; and Cal. Pat. Rolls, 11 Edward II, p.3]

died 1318-19; at his death he was seized of Bewaldeth, held in chief as of the Honour of Cockermouth; five-sixths of Torpenhow with a mill held of Thomas Wake; and the manors of Hayton, Blennerhasset and Upmanby, held of Christina, widow of Thomas de Lucy who had an estate by dowager therein [Cal. i.p.m., 12 Edward II, p.88]

married Euphemia, having two sons, Sir Robert de Mulcaster (his heir) and Richard de Mulcaster
 
succeeded (1318-19) by his eldest son and heir, Sir Robert de Mulcaster, Knt:
Sir Robert de Mulcaster, Knt
of Torpenhow
 
Knight of the Shire (MP) for Cumberland 1325
 
born c1296; succeeded to the property 1318-19.
he also held the manor of Bryarhill (or Brackenhill?)
 
imprisoned at Carlisle Castle 1334 “...for trespass of vert and venison in Inglewood Forest...” [Cal. Close Rolls, 7 Edward III, p.165]
 
in 1341-2 he made a settlement of his manors of Torpenhow, Hayton, Blennerhasset, Whitehall, Bewaldeth and one-fourth part of Upmanby
 
living 1346
 
married Johanna, they having sons William, Robert, John, Walter & Peter
[CWAAS N.S. vol.6, p.237]

                                 

succeeded by his eldest son, William de Mulcaster:
William de Mulcaster
of Torpenhow
died before 1388
 
succeed by his son Robert de Mulcaster, Chivaler:
Robert de Mulcaster, Chivaler
of Torpenhow
 
Knight of the Shire (MP) for Cumberland 1388 (temp. Richard II) 
living 1392; of Torpenhow

he also held “...Hayton, Blennerhasset & Upmanby, of the manor of Aspatria...” [Cal. Esch. 22 Richard II, p.244]
 
the manor of Blennerhasset passed to his daughter & co-heiress <first name unknown>:
 
NOTE: at about this time John de Mulcaster (son of Richard de Mulcaster & Alice Hodwine of Keinton, MP for Carlisle 1420 & 1425-6, and grandson of John de Mulcaster) “...entailed his lands about Carlisle to his heirs male, remainder in fee to the heirs of Alan Blennerhasssett...” temp. Richard II (1377-1399). 

 
 
<???> de Mulcaster <first name unknown>, daughter & co-heir of Robert de Mulcaster
 
from her father she inherited the manor of Blennerhasset
 
she married 1st to Johannes de Hayton of Alderscogh, who held land at Blennerhasset temp. Richard II (1377-1399)
 
she married 2nd c1413 to Sir Peter (Piers, Jeffrey) de Tilliol (Tylliolf) Knt (son of Robert de Tilliol) of Scaleby; Knight of the Shire (MP) for Cumberland; Sheriff of Cumberland 1387/8 & 1394/5 (11 & 18 Richard II) & 1403/5 (5-6 Henry IV); and one of the Commissioners appointed to receive the oaths of allegiance 1433/4 (12 Henry VI); he died 1434/5 (13 Henry VI)
 
by her 2nd marriage she brought the manors of Hayton, Torpenhow and Blennyre (Blennerhasset) to the de Tilliol family
 
they had a son Robert Tilliol and two daughters, Isabel & Margaret, the property going to the son Robert:
Robert de Tilliol
called “the Fool” or “the Idiot”
 
he died without issue c1435/6 (14 Henry VI), one year after the death of his father.
 
his property passed to his two sisters and co-heirs Isabel and Margaret de Tilliol: 
Isabel de Tilliol
(eldest sister of Robert) 
 
Isabel de Tilliol married John Colville (Colvil, Colvill) but had no issue 
Margaret de Tilliol
(second & youngest sister of Robert)
Margaret de Tilliol married 1st to Robert (or Christopher) Moresby (Morseby, Moresbie, Morisby) thus bringing her property, including Blennerhasset, to the Moresby family. Robert Moresby died 1458/9 (37 Henry VI)
 
NOTE: [N&B vol.2 p.121] names him James Moresby
 
the property was inherited by their son, Sir Christopher Moresby, Knt
 
Margaret de Tilliol married 2nd to Thomas Crakenthorp.
Sir Christopher Moresby, Knt 
(son of Margaret de Tilliol)
he died 1461/2 (1 Edward IV), leaving the property to his son Sir Christopher Moresby, Knt
Sir Christopher Moresby, Knt
he married <???>
 
he died 1500/1 (16 Henry VII), leaving the property to his daughter Anne Moresby:
Anne Moresby
she brought her property, including the manor of Blennerhasset, in marriage to Sir James Pickering, Knt, of Killington, Westmorland (son of James Pickering & Margaret Lascelles)
["Pedigrees Recorded at the Heralds' Visitation of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmorland 1615 & 1666" edited by Joseph Foster: Pickering of Thirkeld p.106]
 
the property was inherited by their son & heir Sir Christopher Pickering:
Sir Christopher Pickering 
son & heir of Sir James Pickering ["Pedigrees Recorded at the Heralds' Visitation of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmorland 1615 & 1666" edited by Joseph Foster: Pickering of Thirkeld p.106]
 
he married <???>
 
their daughter and heir was Anne Pickering:
Anne Pickering
she married 1st Sir Francis Weston
 
she married 2nd Sir Henry Knivet (Knevet) before 1543/4 (35 Henry VIII)
 
she married 3rd John Vaughan
 
[N&B vol.2 p.122] claims Thomas Salkeld of Whitehall purchased the manor of Blennerhasset before 1543/4 from Anne Pickering, but this appears not to be the case, he gained it by inheritance from his mother (see below* - need to verify this source).
 
in 1543/4 Torpenhow remained the property of Anne & her 2nd husband Sir Henry Knivet
NOTE: two strands of ownership for Blennerhasset & Upmanby appear to run in parallel for a considerable period and I do not properly understand how they connect.


 
Hugh Lowther
 
my thanks to Will J. Glover of Ontario, Canada, for information on the Hugh Lowther - Earl of Salisbury - Earl of Warwick - Lady Margaret Neville connection.  
The Lowther family was and is a prominent family with extensive land holdings in Cumberland and Westmorland
 
this Hugh Lowther conveyed the manors of Blennerhasset & Upmanby to Richard Neville (I), 5th Earl of Salisbury, facilitated by John Norton, John Laton & Oliver Hudleston jointly
 
NOTE: ["Pedigrees Recorded at the Heralds' Visitation of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmorland 1615 & 1666", edited by Joseph Foster: Lowther of Lowther pp.84-85] tells us there was a Sir Hugh Lowther who married a daughter of Pierce Tilliol
 
John Norton, John Laton & Oliver Hudleston
they were given Power of Attorney by Richard Neville (I), Earl of Salisbury, for them to jointly receive the manors of Blennerhasset & Upmanby from Henry Lowther on Salisbury's behalf
Richard Neville (I)
5th Earl of Salisbury
b.c1400 at Raby Castle, Durham, 3rd son of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland
 
m.1428 Alice Montacute
 
The Earl of Salisbury gained Blennerhasett & Upmanby from Hugh Lowther on 3-Feb 1432 (10 Henry VI), this facilitated by John Norton, John Laton & Oliver Hudleston jointly
 
at his death on 31-Dec-1460 Blennerhasset & Upmanby passed to his son Richard Neville (II), Earl of Warwick, "The Kingmaker"
Richard Neville (II) The Kingmaker
16th Earl of Warwick
6th Earl of Salisbury
Knight of the Garter
 
Joint Warden of Carlisle and the West Marches towards Scotland 1453
b.1428
 
the mother of his natural (illegitimate but acknowledged) 1st child Lady Margaret Neville, born prior to his marriage to Anne de Beauchamp c1449, is unknown 
 
he m.c1449 Anne de Beauchamp (daughter and heiress of 15th Earl of Warwick) whose 1st child Isabel Neville was b.1451
 
her 2nd child Anne Neville married twice:
m.1st Edward of Westminster (son of King Henry VI) who is bur. at Tewkesbury Abbey
   and
m.2nd 1472 Richard, Duke of Gloucester (King Richard III)
 
"The Manors were then inherited by Warwick, by Warwick's illegitimate daughter Lady Margaret (Neville) Huddleston, by Lady Huddleston's son Richard Huddleston under the guardianship of his step-father Sir Lancelot Threlkeld, and by Lady Huddleston's daughter Margaret (Huddleston) Salkeld.  They remained for a time in the Salkeld family."
[Cumb. B. 474. Letter of attorney by Richard, Earl of Salisbury, for John Norton, John Laton, and Oliver Hodelston to receive from Hugh Louther, esquire, seisin of the manors, &c., of Blenarhasset and Ukmanby. 3-Feb-1431/2 (10 Henry VI)]
 
From: [Deeds: B.401-B.500 "A Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds" vol.1 1890, pp.252-261]
 
d.1471 killed at the battle of Barnet, the manors of Blennerhasset & Upmanby passing to his illegitimate but acknowledged daughter Lady Margaret Neville
Lady Margaret Neville-Hudleston-Threlkeld
 
natural (illegitimate but acknowledged) daughter of Richard Neville (II) The Kingmaker
16th Earl of Warwick
 
 
[BLG HUDLESTON of HUTTON JOHN] 
 
["Pedigrees Recorded at the Heralds' Visitation of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmorland 1615 & 1666" edited by Joseph Foster: Hudleston of Millum pp.64-65 & Salkeld of Gawbarrow pp.112-113]
 
my thanks to Will J. Glover of Ontario, Canada, for information on Lady Margaret Neville.
see his post here
 
see also an earlier post by Brad Verity here
 
 
the name of her mother is unknown
 
born c1440s, before 1449
 
Lady Margaret Neville m.1st c1465 Sir Richard Hudleston (I) KB, of Millom Castle, Cumberland (d.bef.1486/7); eldest son of Sir John Hudleston (Hodleston, Huddleston) Knt of Millom Castle (d.1493) and Mary Fenwick of Fenwick, Northumberland [BLG HUDLESTON of HUTTON JOHN]
 
Lady Margaret Neville by Sir Richard Hudleston had issue three children:
 
1. Richard Hudleston (II) b.c1476; m. Elizabeth Dacre, dau. of Humphrey, 1st Baron Dacre, of Gillesland, Cumberland (Richard being kidnapped by Mabel Dacre & compelled to marry her daughter Elizabeth, who was perhaps 17 years his senior)
 
2. Margaret Hudleston b.c1479; m. Lancelot Salkeld of Gawbarrow (also of Whitehall?), Cumberland, son of John Salkeld of Gawbarrow (Goberoo)
["Pedigrees Recorded at the Heralds' Visitation of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmorland 1615 & 1666" edited by Joseph Foster": Hudleston of Millum pp.64-65 & Salkeld of Gawbarrow pp.112-113]
 
3. Joan Hudleston b.c1485; m. Hugh Fleming, of Rydal, Westmorland (Escheator for Cumberland and Westmorland 33 Henry VIII, 1541/42), son of John Fleming & Jane (Jennet) Lowther, daughter of Sir Hugh Lowther
 
as half-sister to the Queen consort (Anne Neville) she and her husband Sir Richard Hudleston (I) attended the coronation of King Richard III
 
she married 2nd Sir Lancelot Threlkeld, Knt (II), of Yanwith, Westmorland, Sheriff of Cumberland.
 
Inq. taken at Caldbecke, County Cumberland 17 Hen. 7 (1502) after the death of Margaret Hudelston widow deceased. Seised of manors of Blennerhasset and Upmanby in said county and lands in Penreth and Caldegate.  She died 17 Oct. 14 Hen. VII (1499) and Richard Hudelston is her son and next heir and is aged 21 and more. Sir Lancelot Thyrkeld Knt, occupied and received the issues and profits of the said Manors from the said 17 Oct. 14 Hen. VII to the Feast of St. Martin 11 Nov. 17 Hen. VII (1502) and the said Richard Hudelston occupied and received the issues of the same from the said Feast of St. Martin to the date of this Inq. [i.p.m. Chancery Series, 19 Henry VII]
 
Lady Margaret Neville acquired by inheritance from her father, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, the manors of Blennerhasset & Upmanby in Co.Cumberland; also lands at Carlisle and Penrith, Co.Cumberland; Amotbrige, Co.Westmoreland; Egilthorp, Bamyngham, Bows, Bolron and Lartyngton, Co.York [Cal. i.p.m. Henry VII, vol.2 p.762, vol.3 p.66, p.313]. She held these until her death on 17-Oct-1499
 
Her son and heir Richard Hudleston (II) being under the age of 21 years at the time of her death, her estate including the manor of Blennerhasset was under the guardianship of the King until Richard reached his majority.
The King as guardian to Richard Hudleston (II) in his minority
the King (Henry VII), as guardian to Richard Hudleston (II) in his minority from 1499 to 1502, was represented by Richard's stepfather Sir Lancelot Threkeld, Knt (II), of Yanwith, Westmorland; Sheriff of Cumberland
Sir Lancelot Threkeld, Knt (II)
Sheriff of Cumberland 
of Yanwith, Westmorland
 
son of Sir Lancelet Threkeld, Knt (I), i.e. "...He was son of Sir Lancelot Threlkeld (see Wordsworth) who saved Henry "the Shepherd Lord" Clifford whose father John Clifford killed the Duke of York, much to the angst of Edward IV, Richard III, and the Duke of Clarence (the Sons of York - see Shakespeare, Richard III).  Lady Margaret was also half-sister to Queen Anne (Neville), wife of Richard III (Shakespeare presents Anne as having been murdered by Richard III and haunting Richard III as a ghost)." [Will Glover 2012] 
 
he m.1st Elyn (Ellen) Radcliffe
 
he m.2nd Lady Margaret Neville Hudleston
 
"The eldest son of Sir Lancelot (Threlkeld), and the second of that name, married firstly, Elyn Radclyffe, as I find briefly stated in a pedigree attached to my papers on the Lowther House, in Penrith. Writing at Naples, without being able to refer to my authority, I cannot give my proofs, but I am sure the statement is correct.  I think she would be the mother of his children. His second marriage was, like his father's, calculated to bring eclat and a good dowry to his house, for Margaret was the illegitimate daughter of Richard Neville, the great Earl of Warwick, and widow of Richard Hudleston, K.B., eldest son of Sir John Hudleston, of Millom, whom he predeceased. By Sir Richard she had a son and two daughters."
[CWAAS: "The Threlkelds of Threlkeld, Yanwath, and Crosby Ravensworth" by W. Jackson, F.S.A., read at Kirkby Stephen, July 1887] 
 
1506 - Westminster
May 5. Pardon and release to Launcelot Trikkell or Trikked, Knt, of Yanswith, co. Westmoreland, late sheriff of Cumberland, of all matters connected with his office of sheriff of Westmoreland between Michaelmas, 17 Henry VII, and Michaelmas, 8 Henry VII, and his office of sheriff of Cumberland. And pardon of all entries on the manors of Blenerhasset and Upmanby, Co.Cumberland, and on all lands in those places and in Carlisle and Penrith, Co.Cumberland, Amotbrige, Co.Westmoreland, Egilthorp, Bamyngham, Bows, Bolron and Lartyngton, Co.York, which belonged to Margaret late the wife of the said Launcelot, of her inheritance, and at her death came to the king's hands by the minority of Richard Huddilston, son and heir of the said Margaret.
[Cal. Pat. Rolls, Henry VII 1494-1509] 
 
Sir Lancelot Threkeld, Knt (II) held Blennerhassett & Upmanby for the King, as guardian for his own stepson Richard Hudleston, from his wife's death (17-Oct-1499) until Richard reached the age of 21 years (11-Nov-1502)
Richard Hudleston (II)
 
b.c1481 (although [BLG HUDLESTON of HUTTON JOHN] has b.1476) son of Sir John Hudleston of Millom Castle, Cumberland
 
he held his mother's estates including the manors of Blennerhasset & Upmanby from his reaching the age of 21 years (the feast of St Martin, 11-Nov-1502, 17 Henry VII) until his death soon after on 5-Oct-1502 (17 Henry VII), when they passed to his sister Margaret Hudleston. At his death lands gained from his father Sir Richard Hudleston went (following the entail) to his uncle John Hudleston
Margaret Hudleston
and
Joan Hudleston
sisters and co-heirs of Richard Hudleston (II)

 
["Pedigrees Recorded at the Heralds' Visitation of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmorland 1615 & 1666, Edited by Joseph Foster": Hudleston of Millum pp.64-65, Salkeld of Torby & Thrymby p.112, Salkeld of Gawbarrow p.113]  

 
Margaret married Lancelot Salkeld of Gawbarrow (also of Whitehall?), son of John Salkeld of Gawbarrow (Goberoo)
["Pedigrees Recorded at the Heralds' Visitation of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmorland 1615 & 1666, Edited by Joseph Foster": Salkeld of Torby & Thrymby p.112, Salkeld of Gawbarrow p.113]
 
they had a son Thomas Salkeld, Esq. of Whitehall, Cumberland
 
at the death of her brother Richard Hudleston (II) in 17 Henry VII (1502/3) Margaret Hudleston was co-heir with her sister Joan Hudleston. Margaret Huddleston inherited the manors of Blennerhasset & Upmanby - what did Joan inherit?
 
Will Glover tells me that in 1538 Lancelot Salkeld signed over half the profits of the manor of Blennerhasset to Hugh Fleming.  Is Hugh perhaps a descendant of Joan Hudleston-Fleming? if so, did Margaret's descendent decided to share Blennerhasset with Joan's descendent?
 
 

 
Joan Hudleston b.c1485
 
Joan m. Hugh Fleming, of Rydal, Westmorland (Escheator for Cumberland and Westmorland 33 Henry VIII, 1541/42), son of John Fleming & Jane (Jennet) Lowther, daughter of Sir Hugh Lowther
 
at the death of her brother Richard Hudleston (II) in 1502/3 (17 Henry VII) Joan Hudleston was co-heir with her sister Margaret Hudleston...
 
what was Joan's share of the joint inheritance?
was she part owner of the manors of Blennerhasset & Upmanby?
Thomas Salkeld
of Whitehall (Whyt Hall), Cumberland
in 1543/4 Thomas Salkeld held Blennerhasset “...of the king in capite, by the service of the third part of one knight's fee, 12s cornage, 6 1/2d seawake, and puture of the segeants...” [N&B vol.2 p.122]
 
[N&B vol.2 p.122] claims this Thomas Salkeld of Whitehall purchased the manor of Blennerhasset before 1543/4 from Anne Pickering (see above* - need to verify this source), but this cannot to be the case, he appears to have gained it by inheritance from his mother

he married Mary Vaux of Caterlen, having a son, Lancelot Salkeld of Whitehall (Whyt Hall):

"The tithes of Bothill and Blennerhasset, which were reserved to the priory of Rossdale, were granted to the Salkelds, and were held till lately with the Whitehall estate." [LYSONS Magna Britannia, 1816 v.4 Cumberland p.162].

Lancelot Salkeld
of Whitehall, Cumberland
in 1577/8 Lancelot Salkeld of Whitehall held the manor of Blennerhasset, “...sometime the land of the Earl of Warwick, by homage, fealty, and suit of court, and paid yearly for cornage 13s 4d; seawake 1s, turn-silver 3s 10d; with sergeant's food; in toto 18s 2d...”
 
Lancelot Salkeld in 1538/9 (30 Henry VIII) signed an award with Hugh Fleming,
“…that the said Hugh should have during his life (which he held by courtesy after the decease of his wife) half the rents and profits of Blenerhasset, half of Hakemanby (i.e. Uckmanby, now named Upmanby)…”
[N&B vol.1 p.160]

he married Elizabeth Berdesey (Bardsey) of Bardsey, Lancashire, they having a son Thomas Salkeld of Whitehall:

Thomas Salkeld
of Whitehall, Cumberland
he married Mary Copeland, having a son Lancelot Salkeld of Whitehall:
Lancelot Salkeld
of Whitehall, Cumberland
he married Dorothy Askeugh of Skeughsby, Yorkshire
having an eldest son and heir:
Sir Francis Salkeld, Knt
of Whitehall, Cumberland
 
 
Sir Francis Salkeld, Knt, of Whitehall
“Lord of the manor of Blennerhasset” in 1687.

he married Anne Strickland and had a son Thomas Salkeld: 

Thomas Salkeld 
he married <???>, having an eldest son Thomas Salkeld:
Thomas Salkeld 
he married <???>, having sons Thomas & Henry Salkeld,
 
his eldest son Thomas Salkeld succeeded
Thomas Salkeld
died without issue, succeeded by his brother Dr Henry Salkeld
Dr Henry Salkeld M.D.
of York

a physican at York; he married <???> Charleton of Hesselside.

he died without issue, leaving his estate to his widow; she died 1769 at Whitehall; thus the Whitehall and Blennerhasset properties both left the Salkeld family
 
<add names here>
 
 
William Lawson
 

photo: BJ
 
An advertisement in the “Mining Journal” of 1860 [MJ 1860 pp.634, 732] offered for sale the “...Blennerhassett Estate, Torpenhow, Cumberland...” including “...minerals under, coal & iron...”.
 
William Lawson of Brayton was interested in the concept of co-operative farming. In October 1861 his father, local landowner Sir Wilfred Wybergh Lawson Bart. of Brayton, gave him "Blennerhasset Farm" on which to experiment with his ideas. The farm was initially 333 acres, to which another farm of 87 acres was added. Lawson organized a farm worker's agricultural cooperative to run the farm, the labourers having a large share of the profits and the provision of machinery being on a co-operative basis.  The experiment had notable successes, but Lawson later disagreed with some of the workers' decisions and they didn't appreciate him attempting to interfere with their policies.  The experiment was terminated after ten years, "the tenants being unable to keep themselves above water", and the farm sold.
 
In 1867 he opened the Blennerhasset village shop and Post Office, which still thrives.  His experiences were published as "Ten Years of Gentleman Farming at Blennerhasset", 1874, reprinted 1875 in the "Good Words" magazine, part of "Experiments in Agriculture, Physical and Social" by John Ludlow [LAWSON] [JONES].
 
William Lawson owned a famous stallion which he named "Co-operation".
 
A "Plan of Blennerhasset Farm, the property of William Lawson, Esq." of June 1870 is at [CRO PR138/33].
William Henry Charlton
of Hesley Side
William Henry Charlton, of Hesley Side
 
during the 19th century Charlton owned Whitehall and Blennerhasset

"The tithes of Bothill and Blennerhasset, which were reserved to the priory of Rossdale, were granted to the Salkelds, and were held till lately with the Whitehall estate. Under the inclosure act an allotment was given in lieu of the tithes of Bothill. Mr Charlton has sold the great tithes of Blennerhasset to Mr Hodgson, of that place; the small tithes belong to the vicar of Torpenhow." [LYSONS Magna Britannia, 1816 v.4 Cumberland p.162].
 
<add names here>
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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