Blennerhassett Family Tree
Genealogy one-name study - by Bill Jehan
   Introduction      INSCRIPTIONS at Norwich, Co.Norfolk
 
Inscriptions at
City of Norwich, Co.Norfolk
 
 
 
 
Street Name - "Hassett Close", Pockthorpe, Norwich
 
 
 
 
From 1551 William Blennerhassett (d.1598) resided at “The Laythes” (a.k.a. “Laythes Hall” or “The Laythes Yard”), part of a former monastic property known as "Monks Grange", at "Pockthorpe Gates". Pockthorpe is now a district of Norwich but then was outside the city, a hamlet across the River Wensum, directly opposite Hassett's Tower (still standing, today known as "Cow Tower" ).
 
As the Blennerhassett seat, “The Laythes” became known as "Hassett's Hall" or “Hassett's House”, these names remaining in use long after the family had departed. Hassett's Hall was built on raised ground, with stone steps leading up to the door and a high stone wall enclosing house and yards.
 
The house was demolished in 1792, a Cavalry Barracks built on the site, the site of the house occupied by the barracks hospital. The barracks outer wall incorporated a portion of the old wall around Hassett's Hall, and when the barracks was demolished in 1963 a portion of cavalry wall, including the older wall, survived ( Warning photograph requested...). The site is now occupied by a 1960s housing estate - among the new street names are “Hassett Close” and “Cavalry Ride”. 
 
 
 
 




 
 
St.Margaret's Church, Norwich
Church of England - Diocese of Norwich
 
ANNE REDE (formerly DUKE, nee Blenerhaysett) b.1515 d.16-Apr-1577
 
Another effigy of Anne is on the grave of her 1st husband George Duke (d.25-Jul-1551) at Frenze
click HERE to view his effigy at Frenze
 
her 2nd husband PETER REDE, d.29-Dec-1568 at London,
was interred at St Sepulchure's without Newgate, London.
He subsequently reinterred at St Peter Mancroft, Norwich
(see below)
 
 
 
 
Ann Wife of Peter Rede Esqr. St. Margaret's Ch. Norwich
Drawn Etched & Published by J.S.Cotman, Yarmouth 1815
 
Drawing of 1815 by John Sell Cotman (pub. in his “Sepulchral Brasses of Norfolk & Suffolk”, 2 vols, 1839) of a
monumental portrait brass on the tomb of Anne Reade, nee Blennerhassett (d.14-Apr-1577)
at the church of St.Margaret, Norwich, Co.Norfolk [COTMAN 1st ed. plate 80 description p.42].
 
St.Margaret is no longer in service as a church, it providing art exhibition space for the city.
When i visited in 2010 the brass was not to be seen.
 Does it survive? Is it perhaps hidden under a boarded portion of the nave floor
 
[BLOMEFIELD 2nd ed.1805 v.4 p.259]
 
 



 
 
 
St.Peter's Mancroft Church, Norwich
Church of England - Diocese of Norwich
 
PETER REDE Esquire d.29-Dec-1568 at London; 2nd husband of
ANNE REDE (formerly DUKE, nee Blenerhaysett) b.1515 d.16-Apr-1577
(see above)
 
The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford brass rubbing collection has this as: Norfolk 3/93

 
Another effigy of Anne is with her 1st husband George Duke (d.25-Jul-1551) at Frenze
click HERE to view his effigy at Frenze
 
 
 
 
[plate] 77
 
 
St. Peter's Mancroft Church, Norwich
Drawn, Etched & Published by J.S.Cotman Yarm[outh] 1814
 
 
Drawing of 1814 by John Sell Cotman (pub. in his “Sepulchral Brasses of Norfolk & Suffolk”, 2 vols, 1839) of a
monumental portrait brass on the tomb of Peter Reade (Rede) d.29-Dec-1568
husband of Anne Blennerhassett of Frenze, Co.Norfolk
at the church of St. Peter's Mancroft, Norwich, Co.Norfolk
[COTMAN 1st ed. plate 77 description p.41]
 
Monumental Brass Society "Brass of the Month" April 2007, with good illustrations.
 
 
 




Norwich Corporation Plate 
 
Inventory of Norwich plate made between 1574 and 1581, written on a fly-leaf of "Liber Ruler Civitasis,
a book given to the city by William Mingaye, Mayor of Norwich, 17-Feb-1562 [Collectanea 157] includes:
 
 
 
 
 
"HEREAFTER ENSTTETH THE PLATE that dothe apperteyne to the Cittie, of whose gifte it was, And what it dothe weye."
 
"Of the gyfte of Peter Reade Esquyer.
 A SALTE w a Cover doble gylte cont iij ozs."
 
"Of the gyfte of John Blenerhasset Esquyer
 A BOLL all Gylte conteynyng xxxiij ozs. qrt.
 A BOLL all gylte conteyning xxix ozs."
 
"Of the gyfte of Peter Peterson Chamberlyne of ye Citie
 A BOLL all gylte conteyning xvj ozs." 
 
 
 
 

 
 "The Reade Salt"
Silver-gilt standing salt, made 1568/9 by William Cobbold of Norwich, for the city of Norwich,
from a bequest of Sir Peter Reade of Norwich (d.29-Dec-1568), husband of Anne Blennerhassett of Frenze, Co.Norfolk 
 
 
 
 
 
 photo: courtesy of Norwich City Council and Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service,
as illustrated in "The Norwich Regalia & Civic Plate", 1984, front cover 
 
This salt is described in "Memorials of old Norfolk" by H.J.Astley, 1908, p.65, as:
 
"...the fine Elizabethan standing salt, given by Sir Peter Reade in 1568. This is cylindrical in form, 15 1/4 inches high and 6 1/4 inches in diameter, and is decorated with masks and scrapwork, flowers and fruit in relief, together with three shields, originally enamelled, bearing the arms of Reade on one, those of Blennerhasset on the second, and Reade impaling Blennerhasset on the other.
 
The high cover, in two stages similarly decorated, is surmounted by a vase-shaped pedestal crowned by a figure resting on a spear and holding a shield with the arms of the city of Norwich. The motto, "ASPERANCE IN DEO", is pounced around the upper part of the body, and this inscription on the base: "THE GYFTE OF PETAR REDAE EQSVIAR".
 
This, like the mace just described, was wrought by a local silversmith, and the writer, in common with others, believes it to have been made by one of the most prominent members of the Norwich Guild, Peter Peterson.
 
The donor of this salt, which is described as a faire salt double gilt of the value of £20, to be used in the Maiors' houses in Norwich in time of their Maioroltie", was the son of John Rede, Mayor of Norwich in 1496. He died in 1568, and was buried in the church of St.Peter Mancroft, Norwich, and, as the inscription on his tombstone commemorates, the Order of Barbaria was conferred upon him for his services under the Emperor Charles V at the conquest of Barbaria and at the siege of Tunis. Large Elizabethan salts of the cylindrical form are far from common..."
 


"The Blennerhassett Cups"
Two silver-gilt taza cups, made in London 1561, given to the city of Norwich by John Blennerhassett MP,
of Barsham Hall Co.Suffolk, brother of Anne Blennerhassett who married Peter Reade
 
photo: courtesy of Norwich City Council and Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service,
as illustrated in "The Norwich Regalia & Civic Plate", 1984, p.17
 

 
 
"The Peterson Cup"
Silver-gilt taza cup given 1574/5 by Norwich Chamberlain and silversmith Peter Peterson, remade c1580 by William Cobbold of Norwich as a heavier cup to match the design of the earlier Blennerhassett cups
 
 
 
 
photo: courtesy of Norwich City Council
and Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service,
as illustrated in "The Norwich Regalia & Civic Plate", 1984, p.17.
Text by Robin Emmerson
 
 
The three cups are described in "Memorials of old Norfolk" by H.J.Astley, 1908, p.66:
 
"...Three more examples of silversmiths' work complete the list of plate of the Elizabethan period at present in the custody of the corporation, namely, the three silver-gilt tazza cups. They have shallow circular bowls with upright sides, supported on thick baluster stems, richly fluted and decorated with repousse work, and the spreading domed feet are ornamented with flutings, etc.
 
The two earliest, which have the london date-letter for 1561-62, and a maker's mark, a covered cup, are inscribed on the rim in ornamental cusped letters:
" + AL : MI : TRVST : IS : IN : GOD "
Inside the bowls are prints with the arms and name of John Blenerhasset.
 
The other cup [of 1574-5] is inscribed around the bowl in similar lettering:
" + THE MOST HERE OF IS DONE BY PETER PETERSON "
each word being separated by a cross, while inside is a print with the arms of the city of Norwich. It is stamped with two marks - the maker's mark, an orb and cross, and the castle and lion of Norwich. According to the inscription, the whole of the cup was not fashioned by peter peterson himself; he was, doubtless, helped by one or more of the apprentices which this celebrated silversmith must have had.
 
NOTE: These four pieces of Norwich plate are also illustrated in:
"The Notices and Illustrations of the Costume, Processions, Pagentry, etc. formerly displayed by the Corporation of Norwich", pub. by Musket 1850, ed. W.C.Ewing, pp.29-32
"The Corporation Plate of England and Wales" by L.Jewett and W.H. St.John Hope, 1895, vol.2 p.189
"Memorials of old Norfolk" by H.J.Astley, 1908, plate IV, No's 1 & 2
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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