Blennerhassett Family Tree
Genealogy one-name study - by Bill Jehan
 
 
 
Blennerhassett Inscriptions at the church of
St. John the Baptist, Campsea Ashe
near Loudham, Co.Suffolk
 
Church of England - Diocese of Norwich

In earlier times Campsea Ashe was spelled variously, as:
Campesse, Capesea, Capsea, Camsey, Camesy, Campsey, Campessy, Campsea...
...Ash, Ashe, Ahys, Ayssch, Asshe
also: Ayssch next Campsey, Ashe juxta Campessy, Ash by Campsey, Ash next Campsey

The Convent of Campsea was also known as Campsea Abbey or Ashe Abbey






go to: "The History of Campsea Ashe" by Rev. F. G. L. Lucas, rector, begun in 1909

go to: "St John the Baptist Campsea Ashe" by Peter J. Carter, 2011




 
 
photo: BJ
 
 
photo: BJ
 
 
 
 
 
The Blennerhassett family of Frenze (Norfolk), Loudham and Pettistree (Suffolk) had close connections with Campsea Ashe.

Ralph Blenerhaysettt (b.c1400 d.1475) of Carlisle and Great Orton, Cumberland married Joan de Loudham (Lowdham) (heiress of Loudham & Frenze) and settled, the first of the Blennerhassett name in East Anglia. His descendant Edward Blenerhaysett of Loudham is buried in the church at Campsea Ashe.
 
In the sanctury floor, at each side of the altar, lie a matching pair of finely worked ledger slabs, in similar style, of the same dimensions and made from the same black marble.
Clearly the work of the same mason, they are memorials to brothers-in-law who died within a month of each other.
 
 
 
 
 
on the north side of the sanctury:
WILLIAM GLOVER (1589-1641)

Tomb of William Glover of Campsea Ashe and Frostenden Hall,
husband of Anne Blennerhassett,
sister of Edward Blennerhassett who lies alongside.





In the Chancel to the left of the Altar.
The marble altar rail may be seen at the foot of the image.
 
 
on the south side of the sanctury:
EDWARD BLENERHAYSET (1604-1641)
 
Tomb of Edward Blennerhassett of Loudham and Campsea Ashe
(bapt.4-Sep-1604 at Pettistree; died unmarried, interred 10-Jun-1641).
Edu. at Peterhouse College, Cambridge - oldest of Cambridge colleges.
Son of Samuel Blennerhassett Jr of Loudham Hall and brother of Samuel Blennerhassett Jr, who in 1627 sold the manor of Loudham out of the Blennerhassett family, to Sir Henry Wood.
 
 
In the Chancel to the right of the Altar.
The marble altar rail may be seen at the foot of the image.
 
 
 
photo: BJ                      click on image to enlarge
click on image to enlarge
 
photo: BJ                      click on image to enlarge     xxx
click on image to enlarge
 
 
 
 
HERE LYETH
INTERRED THE BODY OF WILLIAM GLOVER
ESQVIRE WHO
WAS VNHAPPILY SLAINE   IVLY (July) 1641*
 
[roundel containing Glover coat-of-arms:]
"Sable a fess embattled ermine between three crescents Argent"

BEHOLD IN ME THE LIFE OF MAN
COMPARED BY DAVID TO A SPANN
LET FREINDS & KINRED WEEPE NO MORE
HERE'S ALL THE ODDS  -  I WENT AFORE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
* July may be an error - the entry in burial register is dated 23-June

William Glover was born in Campsea Ashe in 1589, grandson of John Glover who had commenced building the High House in 1558.
His father, another William Glover, had completed the mansion by 1600. William inherited the High House and its estate on the death of his father William in 1629.

William Glover married Anne Blennerhassett,
daughter of Samuel Blennerhassett of Loudham.
They had three children, all born at Campsea Ashe.
William was murdered in 1641, aged 52 years, attacked and killed
by two men outside the White Hart Public House in Wickham Market. 

Four generations of the Glover family were Lords of the Manor, for a span of 94 years. The High House and Estate was sold out of the family in 1652, to John Sheppard of Mendlesham.
                  and [Campsea Ashe Church Guide Booklet, p.6]

During the 17th century William Glover of the High House also held the manors of Ashmoor Hall and Frostenden Hall, Suffolk.
 
Below is a sketch of the quarterly arms of William Glover of Frostendan Hall (formerly of High House, Campsey Ashe) quartered with the arms of Loudham and of his wife Anne Blennerhassett (dau. of Samuel BH & sister of Edward Blennerhassett who is interred at Campsey Ashe).

William Glover removed to Frostenden Hall and in 1626 presented to the church there. He died at Frostenden in 1628, age 83. The sketch is from "Visitation of Norfolk" (year?) [VoN plate III]
 
click on image to view full page
arms quarterly: 1st Glover, 2nd Blenerhassett
                       3rd Loudham,     4th Glover
--------------------
 
[1.] W[illia]m Glover: Frostenden, Suff[olk]
 2.   Blenerhassett
 3.   Loudham
[4.   Glover]
 
"To London with his patent of Counboden.[?]"

annotation:
g = Gules (red), A = Argent (silver/white), s = Sable (black)
 
Glover = "Sable, a fess embattled ermine between 3 crescents Argent"

Blennerhassett = "Gules, a chevron ermine,
between three dolphins embowed Argent"

Lowdham = "Argent, 3 escutcheons Sable"
 
 
Below are two related Glover monuments at Frostenden church, Suffolk, listed in: "A Summary Catalogue of Sepulchral Memorials and Remains of Ancient Art Existing in Parish Churches. Hundred of Blything, Suffolk" published in "The Topographer and Genealogist" v.1 1846, p.477:

"In the floor, other stones for Glovers, &c."
 
 
Translation of these inscriptions:
2. "William Glover, only son and heir of William Glover formerly of Ash near Campsey in the county of Suffolk, died 11th March 1660, aged 42 years."
 
3. "William Glover, Patron of this church, died 20th September 1726, aged 83 years".
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HERE LYETH INTERRED THE
BODY OF EDWARD BLENERHAYSET, THE YOVNGEST
SONNE OF SAMVELL BLENERHAYSET
OF LOWDHAM ESQVIRE   IVNE (June) 1641 

[roundel containing Blennerhassett coat-of-arms:]
"Gules, a chevron ermine, between three dolphins embowed Argent"
 

(to the north-west of the roundel is a small fossil ammonite)

NOT THAT HE NEEDETH MONEMENTS OF STON[E]
FOR HIS WEIL [well] GOTTEN FAME TO REST VPPON
BVT THIS WAS LAID TO TESTIFIE THAT HEE
LIVES IN THEIR LOVES Y[A]T [that] Y[E]T SVRVYVING BEE
FOR VNTO VERTVE WHO FIRST RAISED HIS NAME
HE LEFT THE PRESERVATION OF THE SAME
AND TO POSTERITY REMAINE IT SHALL
WHEN BRASSE & MARBLE MONEMENTS SHALL FAIL [fall]

last two lines of verse are omitted from the inscription:

LEARN FOR TO DIE WHILE THOU HAST BREATH
SO SHALT THOU LIVE AFTER THY DEATH
 
 
Edward Blennerhassett was interred 10-Jun-1641
 
Note: At the time of Edward Blennerhassett's death in 1641 the Blennerhassett family had not been resident at nearby Loudham Hall since 1627, when the manor of Loudham was sold by Edward's brother Samuel Blennerhassett Jr to Sir Henry Wood. 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
BLENERHAYSET - BRAHAM family connections

 
 
Ralph Blennerhassett's grandson Sir Thomas Blennerhassett, Kt (b.c1461 d.1531) of Frenze, Nortfolk, married as his 2nd wife Margaret Braham (d.23-Jul-1561), of the Braham (Brame) family from Wetheringsett, Suffolk. The Braham family also held the manor of Campsea Ashe, John Braham (I) being Lord of the manor c1590. He married Rose Armiger of Campsea Ashe, was succeeded by their son John Braham (II) then by his son John Braham (III) who was b.1635 at Campsey Ashe.
 
John Braham (III) "...married Mary Darnell, daughter of Ralph Darnell Esq.. Mary died in child birth and was buried in February 1660. Her large memorial in the center of the chancel shows the importance of the family in the community andalso the grief of the family. The Braham family lived in the village at Chantry Farm and were Lords of Ashe Manor from 1590 to 1706, although some members continued to reside here until the mid 1700's."

In the 17th century John Braham, Lord of the Manor, resided at "Ash Manor", later named "Park House", since 1922 called "Chantry Farm".

image courtesy of Gravestone Photographic Resource (GPR No.2158) - used with permission

ledger slab for Mary Braham (nee Darnell/Darnall)
on the chancel floor, in the centre aisle by the altar
 

arms of Braham impaling quarterly <???> & Darnall

 HERE LYETH BVRYED THE
BODY OF MARY THE WIFE
OF IOHN BRAHAM GENt[leman] DAVGH-
TER OF RALPH DARNELL ESQ[I]R[E]
WHOE DIED THE SEAVENTH DAY
OF FEBRVARY AN[N]o DOM[INI] 1660

 
 
 
 
 
arms of Braham
(Brame)
 
"Sable a cross
formée fleury Or"

the arms above are

Braham impaling quarterly:
 
   1st & 4th: "on a bend, three leopards faces,
                    between two fleur-de-lys"
 
if you know these arms, please Contact Us
 
   2nd & 3rd: Darnall
 
NOTE: Henry Darnall of Gray's Inn, Counseor at Law, 1603, was granted a Coat of Arms bearing a quartering of the Darnell family of Thornley, Co. Durham:
1st & 4th:  Argent, on a bend between two fleur-de-lys Sable,
                 three leopards faces Or
2nd & 3rd:  Gules on a pale or, a lion rampant Azure

from: ["The Darnall, Darnell Family Including Darneal, Darneille, Darnielle, Darnold, Dernall, Durnall, Durnell & Names Variously Spelled with Allied Families,
by H. C. Smith M.D., v.1 1954]
 
 
 
 
arms of Darnall
(Darnell)
 
"Gules, on a pale Or, a lion rampant Azure"


 
 



 
 
 
Church Plate at Campsea Ashe

[Suffolk Archaeology vol.9 1897, "Church Plate in Suffolk", under "Deanery of Loes" pp.184-185] contains this contribution by:
Rev. Adalbert Wilhelm Van Den Bergh (Vicar of St. Mary-at-Elms, Ispwich, Suffolk 1894-1904):
 
"The following coincidence may also be noteworthy:-  The handsome Flagon and Paten were presented to Campsea Ash Church by Edward Blennerhassett, Esq., in 1641, and in the Nave of the same Church is a grave-stone to the memory of the same Edward Blennerhassett who was slain at the battle of Edgehill 1642."
 
However, the English Civil War "Battle of Edgehill" was fought on 23-Oct-1642, so Edward having died in June 1641 spoils what otherwise would have made a good story.....
 
The communion plate presented by Edward Blennerhasset to Campsea Ashe church is listed in
"The History of Campsea Ashe", by Rev. F. G. L. Lucas (1909 onwards), as:
 
FLAGON     - silver, height 11 1/2 inches; weight 1lb. 6 1/2 ounces
                 - engraved with the Arms & Crest of the Blenerhaysets, and the inscription:-
                            "The gift of Edwin* Blenerhayset Esquire Anno Do[mini] 1641"
                                                (NOTE: 1641 is the year in which the donor died)                                                
        * This name here should be Edward, not Edwin. The original 1909 Ms. "The History of Campsea Ashe"
                          no doubt had the name as Edwd but when later transcribed it evolved into Edwin.
                          An alternative description gives the name correctly, i.e:
                                    "One large silver tankard with the name Edward Blenerhayset, Esq.
                                      Anno Domini 1641 being the donor engraven upon it"
 
PATENS      - silver, height 1 9/16 inches; weight 5 3/4 ounces
                 - with the Blenerhayset Arms on the bottom, & the inscription round the under side.
      
CHALICE    - silver (gilt inside); height 1 1/8 inches; weight 5 ounces
                 - with "1569" inscribed on the top
     NOTE: an alternative description has: "One small silver cup and cover, the cover has the date 1569 upon it"
 
SPOON       - silver, with figure of Apostle at the end of the handle (modern)
 
 
 




 
 
Blennerhassett at the Convent of Campsea
(also known as Campsea Priory, Campsea Abbey or Ashe Abbey)

 
 
Ralph Blennerhassett (b.c1400 d.1475) of Carlisle and Great Orton, Cumberland married Joan de Lowdham (heiress of Loudham, Frenze & Kelvedon) and settled at Frenze, the first of the name in East Anglia.
 
Anna and Margaret Blennerhassett, grand-daughters of Ralph Blennerhassett and perhaps sisters, were nuns of the order of St.Clare at the convent of Campsea Abbey, each at different times each serving as Prioress.


1. Anna Blennerhassett (alias Hassett) was a nun at the Convent of Campsea during the period c1492-c1513.

[VoN/1592 p.36] contains a list of nuns at Campsea, including "Domina Anna Blanerhasett".
She is also the Prioress of Campsea listed in 1502 as "Anna", with no surname given.

This Anna Hassett is listed as being an English pilgrim at Rome on 16-March-1492, in a "List of Members of the Hospice Confraternity" [Ms. Liber 16 (f.8) at the "Venerable English College", Rome, Italy].
The entry reads:  "Noimina Fratrum receptorum in Roma de Diocesi Norwicensis(…)
                           Domina Anna Hassett, die Marcij XVI 1492"
                         ("In the name of the receiving brothers in Rome, from the diocese of Norwich,
                           Mistress Anna Hasset, March 16th 1492").

That Ms. has been studied studied and reported on in "The English Hospice in Rome", published in ["The Venerable" vol. 21, 1962] (we need a copy of this). Suffolk antiquarian David Elisha Davy found a mention of it in a document sent by Sir W.C.Trevelyan (1797-1879) to Rev. Dr. George Bitton Jernnyn (1789-1857) [DAVY f.366].

 
2. Margaret Blennerhassett was daughter of John Blennerhassett (b.c1423/4 d.1510) and grand-daughter of Ralph Blennerhassett (b.c1400 d.1475) mentioned above.

This Margaret (Elizabeth?) Blennerhassett was a nun at the Convent of Campsea.
She was Prioress from some date after 1513 to some date before 1526.

[NICHOLS p.25] names her Elizabeth Blennerhassett, Prioress in 1517, but all other sources including the Visitation of Suffolk [VoS/1561 p.355] name her Margaret.
The name Elizabeth appears to be an error - perhaps the name of another sister of Margaret.

[SRO Ms. HD 1538/41/5 undated] contains a response of the Prioress of Campsea to the Lord of the Manor of Loudham, consisting of a schedule of pieces of land, this Ms. being endorsed "Blenerhayset".
 
 
NOTES:
The Convent ruins are about one mile from the Blennerhassett seat at Loudham (where exactly?).

The Visitation of Suffolk [VoS/1561 p.377] quotes [KEMP] as writing (in error) that this convent was at Kempsey in Gloucestershire.
 
Sir Henry Wood, who in 1627 purchased Loudham Hall from Samuel Blennerhassett Jr, later also purchased the site of Convent of Campsea, from Frederick Scot who had obtained it from the heirs of John Lane [NICHOLS p.26].
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Key 
 
 
 
Bill Jehan is on LinkedIn 
 
 
 
 

copyright © 2008-2017 Bill Jehan