Blennerhassett Family Tree
Genealogy One-Name Study
   Home      INSCRIPTIONS at Campsea Ashe, Co.Suffolk
 
 
 
Inscriptions at
Campsea Ashe
near Loudham and near Wickham Market, Co.Suffolk
 
In earlier times Campsea Ashe was often spelt Campsey Ash.
The old Convent of Campsea is known as Campsea Abbey or Ashe Abbey.
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
The Convent of Campsea
(also known as Campsea Priory, Campsea Abbey or Ashe Abbey)
 
 spelling variants are Campesse, Camesey, Campsey or Campsea - followed (or not!) by Ash or Ashe
 
 
 
Margaret (not Elizabeth) Blennerhassett was daughter of John Blennerhassett (b.c1423/4 d.1510) and grand-daughter of Ralph Blennerhassett (b.c1400 d.1475) of Loudham Suffolk, Frenze Norfolk and Kelvedon Essex, the first of the name in East Anglia.  Only [NICHOLS p.25] names her Elizabeth, all other sources including the Visitation of Suffolk [VoS/1561 p.355] name her Margaret, Elizabeth being her sister. 
 
Margaret was a nun, a sister of the order of St.Clare and Prioress of the Convent of Campsea at Campsea Ashe, from before 1500 to after 1517.
[SRO Ms. HD 1538/41/5 undated] contains a response of the Prioress of Campsea to the Lord of the Manor of Loudham, consisting of a schedule of pieces of land, this Ms. being endorsed "Blenerhayset".
 
Anna Blennerhassett (alias Hassett) was also a nun at the Convent of Campsea c1492-1532. [VoN/1592 p.36] contains a list of nuns at Campsea, including "Domina Anna Blanerhasett". It is possible Anna was a sister of Margaret Blennerhassett, Prioress of Campsey, but no evidence for this has been found.
 
Anna Hassett is listed as being an English pilgrim at Rome on 16-March-1492, in a "List of Members of the Hospice Confraternity" [Ms. Liber 16 (f.8) at the "Venerable English College", Rome, Italy].
The entry reads: "Noimina Fratrum receptorum in Roma de Diocesi Norwicensis(…) Domina Anna Hassett, die Marcij XVI 1492" ("In the name of the receiving brothers in Rome, from the diocese of Norwich, Mistress Anna Hasset, March 16th 1492").  This Ms. has been studied in "The English Hospice in Rome", published in ["The Venerable" vol. 21, 1962] (I don't have a copy of this) and Suffolk antiquarian David Elisha Davy found a mention of it in a document sent by Sir W.C.Trevelyan (1797-1879) to Rev. Dr. George Bitton Jernnyn (1789-1857) [DAVY f.366].
 
I am told the Convent ruins are about one mile from the Blennerhassett seat at Loudham (where exactly?).
 
NOTES:
The Visitation of Suffolk [VoS/1561 p.377] quotes [KEMP] as writing (in error) that this convent was at Kempsey in Gloucestershire.
 
Sir Henry Wood, who in 1627 purchased Loudham Hall from Samuel Blennerhassett Jr, later also purchased the site of Convent of Campsea, from Frederick Scot who had obtained it from the heirs of John Lane [NICHOLS p.26].
 
 
 

 
 
 
Church of St. John the Baptist, Campsea Ashe
 
Church of England - Diocese of Norwich
 
 
 
 
 
photo: BJ
 
 
photo: BJ
 
 
 
 
In the chancel, one on each side of the altar, lie a pair of large finely worked grave slabs, in the same style,
same black stone, same dimensions and clearly cut by the same mason, memorials to two men dying one month apart.
 
 
 
 
WILLIAM GLOVER (        -1641)
 
Tomb of William Glover who was murdered by
two men at the White Hart, Wickham Market in 1641
[Campsea Ashe Church Guide Booklet, p.6]
 
 
 
In the Chancel to the left of the Altar.
The marble altar rail may be seen at the foot of the image.
 
 
EDWARD BLENNERHASSETT (1604-1641)
 
Tomb of Edward Blennerhassett of Campsea Ashe
(bapt.4-Sep-1604 at Pettistree, interred 10-Jun-1641).
Son of Samuel Blennerhassett Jr of Loudham Hall and brother of Samuel Blennerhassett Jr, who in 1627 sold the manor of Loudham out of the Blennerhassett family, to Sir Henry Wood.
 
In the Chancel to the right of the Altar.
The marble altar rail may be seen at the foot of the image.
 
 
 
photo: BJ         click on image to enlarge (rotated to fit)
click on image to enlarge
 
photo: BJ        click on image to enlarge (rotated to fit)
click on image to enlarge
 
 
 
 
HERE LYETH  
INTERRED THE BODY OF WILLIAM GLOVER 
ESQVIRE WHO  
WAS VNHAPPILY SLAINE  IVLY (July) 1641  
 
( roundel with Glover coat-of-arms )
 
BEHOLD IN ME THE LIFE OF MAN
COMPARED BY DAVID TO A SPANN
LET FREINDS & KINRED WEEPE NO MORE
HERES ALL THE ODDS I WENT AFORE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HERE LYETH INTERRED THE 
BODY OF EDWARD BLENERHAYSET, THE YOVNGEST 
SONNE OF SAMVELL BLENERHAYSET 
OF LOWDHAM ESQVIRE  IVNE (June) 1641 
 
( roundel with Blennerhassett coat-of-arms )
in the stone, upper left of these arms,
may be seen a small fossil ammonite...
 
NOT THAT HE NEEDETH MONEMENTS OF STON[e]
FOR HIS WEIL (well) GOTTEN FAME TO REST VPPON
BVT THIS WAS LAID TO TESTIFIE THAT HEE
LIVES IN THEIR LOVES Y[a]t (that) Y[e]T SVRVYVING BEE
FOR VNTO VERTVE WHO FIRST RAISED HIS NAME
HE LEFT THE PRESERVATION OF THE SAME
AND TO POSTERITY REMAINE IT SHALL
WHEN BRASSE & MARBLE MONEMENTS SHALL FAIL(fall)
 
 
The last two lines of verse are omitted from this inscription:
LEARN FOR TO DIE WHILE THOU HAST BREATH
SO SHALT THOU LIVE AFTER THY DEATH
 
 
 
 
 
[Suffolk Archaeology vol.9 1897, "Church Plate in Suffolk", under "Deanery of Loes" pp.184-185] has an item contributed by Rev. Adalbert Wilhelm Van Den Bergh (Vicar of St. Mary-at-Elms, Ispwich, Co.Suffolk 1894-1904) containing the following note:
 
"The following coincidence may also be noteworthy:-  The handsome Flagon and Paten were presented to Campsea Ash Church by Edward Blennerhassett, Esq., in 1641, and in the Nave of the same Church is a grave-stone to the memory of the same Edward Blennerhassett who was slain at the battle of Edgehill 1642."
 
The Battle of Edgehill during the English Civil War was fought on 23-Oct-1642 but Edward having died in June 1641 spoils the story a little.....
 
I have read <where?> that the silver presented by Edward Blennerhasset to Campsea Ashe church was:
     - Communion flagon, dated 1641
     - Paten
     - Silver chalice and cover, both dated 1569
     - Spoon
 
 
 
Note: At this time, 1641, the Blennerhassett family had not been resident at nearby Loudham Hall since 1627, when the manor of Loudham was sold by Edward's brother Samuel Blennerhassett Jr to Sir Henry Wood. 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Key 
 
 
 
Bill Jehan is on LinkedIn 
 
 
copyright © 2008-2014 Bill Jehan